Baylor Town and Gown: Why Waco? (A Story of the 1920s Greater Baylor Campaign)

By Michelle A.  Diaz

Baylor Town and Gown: Why Waco?

Billboards around the city of Waco today proudly boast “Baylor – Waco, Proud Partners.” This message could easily be taken at face value but, at greater depth, a much richer history and meaning would arise.  The partnership between the institution and the town has been the product of a much earlier debate and a critical time in Baylor’s history that eventually led to this stronger relationship.  During the late 1920s, a proposition was made to uproot Baylor University from her home in Waco, Texas to move to Dallas, Texas for the sum of $1,500,000 and 1,000 acres of land.  This proposition led to an uproar of opinions, conventions, and campaigns for those either supporting the move of Baylor or those opposing it.  The impetus for moving Baylor was for her to be more closely located to her medical department located in Dallas, both of which were owned by the Baptist State Convention.  In the Dallas Morning News, Baylor President Dr.  Samuel Palmer Brooks argued that, although the city of Dallas and some ‘Baptists of Texas’ desired to unite the ‘parent plant’ with the professional schools (The College of Medicine, The College of Dentistry, The School of Pharmacy, The School of Nursing, and Baylor Hospital), he believed that Baylor would be best supported in the Waco community (Dallas Morning News, 1928, n.p.).  In a letter to Brooks, Mr.  Jeff D.  Ray, from the Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, asserted that Baylor’s medical department was a fiscal drain for the university and did not fully represent Baylor’s mission to provide Christian education and the advancement of Baptist principles.  Baylor had invested nearly three million dollars in the medical school and was still in debt for approximately half of the full amount.  His belief was that moving Baylor University to Dallas to be close to the medical school was like ‘mov[ing] the dog to the tail’(Ray, J.  D., 1928, May 3, Letter to Brooks).  Many proponents for keeping Baylor in Waco argued that her long-standing history and relationships in Waco were essential to her future and that a move would severely set the institution back (Dallas Morning News, 1928, December 21, n.p.). 

One newspaper article reported that while Baylor would be moving to Dallas, Marshall College, Burleson College, Decatur College, Rusk College, and Howard-Payne College would all be moved to and consolidated at Waco to create a senior college.  Baylor University would then be settled on land next to an orphanage in Dallas, a few miles outside of the town and just down the street from some of her competitors (Dallas Morning News, 1928, May 1, n.p.).  President Brooks feared that the minimal amenities of Baylor in Waco, which were characterized negatively, would actually be dear to the hearts of so many of Baylor’s alumni.  To remove Baylor from her setting and traditions could create strong opposition within the Baylor family and hinder any chance for her reestablishment in Dallas to be successful (Brooks, S.P., 1928, February 27, Letter to Scarborough).  To this effect, one campaign motto read “Baylor is deeply rooted in Waco — Let it grow” to support the town and gown affiliation between Baylor and Waco (Lattimore, O.S., 1928, May 23, Letter to Baptists).  Town and gown is a higher education euphemism for the connection and rapport between an institution of higher education and her host city.  This can include financial aspects, as well as cultural, historical, and sentimental ones as well.  During the debate over whether or not to move Baylor to Dallas, the constituents of both Baylor and Waco had to undertake the process of evaluating elements of their town and gown relationship and then valuing what such a relationship was worth preserving for all those involved.

Baylor’s History with Waco

Baylor’s history with Waco over the past few decades created a strong relationship between the people of the institution and the town.  Many people responded to the idea of moving Baylor University to Dallas, though some positively and some negatively.  For some residents it was about sentiment, for others it was about practicality.  For many it was about the ties that bound Baylor and Waco together.  Waco had long been contributing to Baylor since her move to the city.  In a letter to President Brooks, alumnus Leland Malone reminded Brooks of the fact that Waco had originally been home to its own institution of higher education.  Malone, a corresponding secretary for the Rusk-Panola Missionary Baptist Association, was referring to the fact that Waco University was consolidated with Baylor University when it moved to Waco in 1886.  Malone used this argument to highlight Waco’s willingness to support Baylor.  Malone also worried about what Waco was to do for higher education if Baylor were to leave.  The city that had made provisions for Baylor might be left without an institution of higher education or one that was not of Baylor’s quality (Malone, L., 1928, March 14, Letter to Brooks).  There was no guarantee in the proposal to move colleges such as Rusk to Waco; it was merely an offer suggested to provide Waco with some form of higher education if Baylor were to leave.  Malone might also have been alluding to the point that many cities are known for their universities and these universities can bring in millions of dollars to support local commerce.  With the economic stimulus created by universities also comes potential fame and prestige, the likes of which were already being seen in town and gown partnerships across the state of Texas (The Baylor Lariat, 1928, p.2). 

            In another letter, this one from President Brooks to Judge F.  M.  Newman, President Brooks expressed his devotion to Waco and his appreciation of the fact that Waco gave Baylor over half of the property that it owned during that time.  Brooks used this fact about Waco’s property contributions to compare with the fact that Dallas had not made provisions for student housing or faculty residence (Brooks, S.  P., 1928, May 1, Letter to Newman).  The housing concern was a reiteration from President Brooks’ address to the Education Relocation Committee given two months prior.  In his address, President Brooks argued that it would be difficult for large numbers of Baylor faculty to leave their Waco homes to relocate themselves to Dallas and find appropriate housing.  Many had lived in Waco for extended periods of time and had been local contributors and strong presences in their local churches, reaching out to the surrounding neighborhoods of places like Mart, TX and Elm Mott, TX.  He even referred to losing faculty to other universities if better offers were given.  President Brooks also had concerns about resurrecting a duplicate of the university’s Waco facilities in Dallas.  From buildings to streets and sidewalks, all of the pieces that were neatly arranged in Waco would have to be reconstructed for a Dallas campus (Brooks, S.P., 1928, February 17, Address).  A plan had not been discussed for what would become of the facilities in Waco, many of which had been donated through local support and held sentimental value within the town.  Dr.  B.  H.  Carroll, benefactor of the Carroll buildings at Baylor, is said to have begged Waco citizens for donations to support the founding of the original buildings for Baylor.  A prominent Waco citizen, William Cameron, is said to have questioned Dr.  Carroll on what guarantee donors would have that their contributions would stay in Waco.  Dr.  Carroll’s response was, “Mr.  Cameron, when the streets of Waco have become pig trails, then will Texas Baptists think of moving Baylor from Waco, and only then.” Little did Dr.  Carroll know, the streets of Waco would not become pigs’ trails, but the thoughts of Baptists would wander and the idea of moving Baylor would creep in slowly (“IV”).

Dr.  Carl Lovelace, Medical Director for the Amicable Life Insurance Company in Waco, wrote President Brooks urging Baylor representatives to remember that a large percentage of her endowment funds were contributed by Wacoans, which in turn also helped Baylor to attain a matching amount given by the general education fund (Lovelace, C., 1928, January 12, Letter to Brooks).  In an editorial in The Daily Lariat, the author wrote about the significance of the relationship between Baylor’s alumni and their time spent in Waco.  The author clearly expressed disdain for the move and used the tradition of Baylor at Waco as a key point:

Neither the sentiment nor the money can be transferred to Dallas nor to any other location.  It would require another forty years to build up a sentiment for a new school in Dallas, for it would have to be a new school.  The real Baylor University cannot be carried to any other spot on earth.  Waco is the real home of Baylor University.  (The Baylor Lariat, 1928, p.  1)

The author also reasoned that towns grow and expand around universities and that Waco could and would do just that (The Baylor Lariat, 1928, p.  1).

The Students of Waco

The relationship of Baylor and her students, both former and current, played a large role in the argument to keep Baylor in Waco.  In a Waco News-Tribune article, the Baylor University Ex-students Association outlined their plan to reach out to Baylor alums, many of whom lived in Waco, to ask for monthly donations in order to save Baylor from the plight of the private schools which were struggling to keep up with state institutions in funding.  Wacoans would benefit from this effort because it complemented Waco in her own efforts of trying to raise funds for faculty salaries, operational costs, and land to grow Baylor (The Waco News-Tribune, n.d., n.p.).  During this time, current students of Baylor were also donating their personal monies to help.  A student-led campus campaign in Waco was created to raise $35,000 for the university’s endowment.  Canvassing the campus and Waco, these students used the slogan “My Best for Baylor” to encourage fellow students, locals, and alumni to contribute (The Baylor Lariat, 1928, p.  1).  A ledger from one of the dean’s offices notes that students contributed a wide range of amounts, from pocket change to small bills, to keep their soon-to-be alma mater in Waco (Student Pledges).  Concern also centered around the amount of student housing available at either location, but Baylor at Waco had the opportunity to erect a women’s dormitory from the support of the Baptist women of Texas (Brooks, S.P., 1928, February 17, Address). 

“My Best For Baylor”, The Lariat
Photo courtesy of the Baylor University Archives

Another argument for remaining in Waco, as noted in President Brooks’ address to the Education Relocation Committee, was the giving to university athletics.  President Brooks contends that many gifts were received to support the athletics at Baylor in the hopes of having winning teams.  He talked about the young men recruited from the city of Waco and the risk of losing them to other schools while the matter of moving was still under public discussion.  He also expressed his worry about losing athletes that were currently attending the school if they decided to transfer to a more stable institution (Brooks, S.P., 1928, February 17, Address).  Dr.  Carl Lovelace shared the same sentiments in another letter to President Brooks in January of 1928.  Dr.  Lovelace argued that no one in Waco honestly believed a move would occur, but that the looming threat of it was enough to hinder his unofficial local recruiting efforts for Baylor athletics programs.  He claimed that ‘promising high-school athletes’ from the Waco High championship team of 1927 might have been lost to Baylor because of the whole ordeal (Lovelace, C., 1928, January 10, Letter to Brooks).

The Waco Community

According to President Brooks, it was crucial for members of the Waco community to rise to the challenge of securing Baylor’s future in the town.  Avid support from the local community would display Waco’s need and affinity for Baylor which was needed to contend against any doubts of the relationship or its future.  From city representatives to passionate community members, everyone was needed for the campaign.  “Waco is seething” was President Brooks’ description in multiple letters to attract support (Brooks, S.P., 1928, April 21, Letter to Scarborough). 

President Brooks noted in a letter to Dr.  L.  R.  Scarborough, president of Southwestern Baptist Theological seminary, that the new mayor of Waco would be travelling to Dallas to represent the community and Waco Chamber of Commerce (Brooks, S.P., 1928, April 21, Letter to Scarborough).  According to Jim Penland, a member of the Chamber of Commerce, the mayor was going to the meeting in Dallas because he not only needed to represent the Chamber, but he also felt compelled to support Baylor as a local citizen and educator (Brooks, S.P., 1928, April 21, Letter to Scarborough).  An edition of the Daily Lariat entitled “A Greater Baylor in Waco” detailed the positive benefits Baylor was receiving from the Waco Chamber of Commerce as a result of the moving debate.  Charlie Watkins, manager of the “Forward With Waco” movement, paid a visit to chapel and assured the student body that the Chamber of Commerce would be good in their promise to erect a new women’s dormitory, a chapel, and an athletic stadium.  Construction was to begin once the location of Baylor University was secured in Waco (The Baylor Lariat, 1928, p.  1).  The Waco Baylor Committee continued collecting funds for such projects and the new chapel, called Waco Hall, started to take shape in 1929, around a year after Watkins’ chapel speech (Finney, L.  E., 1929, November 20, Report of the Greater Baylor Campaign Committee).

“A Greater Baylor in Waco” Edition, The Lariat
Photo courtesy of the Baylor University Archives

Not only did city government support Baylor in Waco, but local individuals and businesses did as well.  Committees were formed and offices were created.  An office for the Movement for the Perpetuation of Baylor University was set in the Amicable Building in Waco (Lattimore, O.S., 1928, May 23, Letter to Baptists) and the Greater Baylor University Campaign office was located at the local First State Bank (Committee of One Hundred, Baptist Bulwark).   According to the minutes of a meeting of the Greater Baylor Campaign Commission of One Hundred, the First Baptist Church of Waco served as a meeting ground as well as the Hilton Hotel in downtown Waco (Finney, L.  E., 1929, November 20, Minutes of meeting of Commission of One Hundred).  The committee itself contained almost two dozen influential members from the Waco community (Committee of One Hundred, Baptist Bulwark).

Influential businessmen such as J.  M.  Penland, president of the Waco Drug Company, contributed funds and organized constituencies to keep Baylor in Waco.  Mr.  Penland specifically created opportunities for the Education Relocation Committee and Waco representatives to confer and deliberate.  Others supported the initiative by placing ads of support in the Daily Lariat, such as those sponsored by the First State Bank and Trust Co.  and the Texas Power & Light Co.  depicted in the “Greater Baylor in Waco” edition (The Baylor Lariat, 1928, p.  2).  Dr.  Lovelace noted two influential donors in his letter to President Brooks, Mr.  F.  L.  Carroll and Mrs.  Kendall.  Mr.  Carroll, of course, aided in the support of Carroll Chapel.  Dr.  Lovelace also recalled two major donors that he had spoken with who had canceled checks to the university because of unrest about the potential move (Lovelace, C., 1928, January 10, Letter to Brooks).  This cancelation of donations clearly depicted the worry that some big donors would be shaken from their support if the debate to move endured for a great length of time.

Although big donors certainly spurred the campaign along, it was also the grassroots fundraising of the Waco Baptist Association that collected monies from nearby communities in the greater Waco area and from numerous local individuals (Nash, J.  M., Waco Baptist Association donations).  President Brooks raised this point in his address to the Education Relocation Committee to signify that all of Waco’s citizens and the surrounding communities, from the more prominent businessmen to the small church congregations, were contributing to a solid, collaborative effort to maintain the institution’s residency in Waco.  He also stated,

Last year we raised from the non-Baptist business men and firms of Waco about $75,000 in subscriptions.  Half of this amount was paid last year.  The remainder is due this year.  It is inevitable that Waco men will pay reluctantly the balance with the idea of removal constantly before them.  Until the matter is settled we cannot ask Waco for any other money.  Nor need we ask anybody anywhere.  (Brooks, S.P., 1928, February 17, Address).

Mr.  Jeff D.  Ray mentioned another factor in the hesitation to give to Baylor.  He asserted that there were a growing number of people  concerned that a significant amount of donations were being given to Baylor’s medical school in Dallas rather than the Waco campus.  This is also part of his reasoning in suggesting that Baylor sell the medical school in Dallas to further support the campus in Waco (Ray, J.  D., 1928, May 3, Letter to Brooks).  Selling the medical school was not a foreign idea at the time, but it was not yet a popular one.  The Greater Baylor Campaign efforts needed to remain focused and unified on keeping Baylor in Waco, so little attention could be spared to address other political topics such as the medical school.

The Waco Church

One of the biggest proponents of support in the Waco community was the local church.  In the Official Speakers’ Manual created by the Greater Baylor University Campaign in 1928, prospective donors were encouraged to remember the Christian mission of Baylor University and her uniqueness among private institutions.   The manual articulated that “the mission of the Christian college is to train the mind, develop the body, establish Jesus Christ as the sovereign of the human heart, and instill in youth Christian standards of behavior.” This message was used to call on the Baptist faithful for support in keeping Baylor in the community of Waco where it already had ties.  Speakers were also reminded that the demand for higher education was growing nationally and that alumni would need to give in order to maintain Baylor’s place among the national institutions.  The document also stated that Waco had “demonstrated her loyalty to Baylor in superb fashion” in reference to the fundraising efforts of the small town.  Prospective donors were also reminded that Baylor had received little support from the denomination and that Waco was making the first steps in helping the university recover from debt (Greater Baylor University Campaign, Official Speaker’s Manual).

Efforts of fundraising in Waco were greatly aided by the local churches.  The Waco Baptist Pastors’ Association agreed to educate everyone in their reach about the situation and then set forth to raise the funds from their congregations (The Dallas News, 1928, p.  2).  The vice-chairman of the Greater Baylor in Waco Campaign wrote Brother Dawson, pastor of the First Baptist Church of Waco, to secure the help of all the local churches regardless of denomination (Smyth, E.  B., 1930, December 15, Letter to Reverend Dawson).  Fortunately, the local church leaders were able to do just that despite financial struggles.  From Baptists to Methodists to Presbyterians, the religious community of the greater Waco area brought forth numerous donations as indicated by one report detailing over $23,000 worth of church pledges (Fisher, J.  B., 1930, December 18, First Baptist Church donations).  The rationale of the success lies within a letter written to Reverend A.  C.  Donath of the First Baptist Church of Mart.  The letter explicitly charged Rev.  Donath to reach out to his congregation because the people of his church would be more responsive to his entreaty than that of a campaign committee.  Rev.  Donath was also presented with specific names and people of position that the campaign sought to beseech for funds (Penland, G.  H., 1928, May 16, Letter to Brother Donath).  This strategic, but personalized, effort led to a great many donations.

Most importantly, the relationship between Baylor and the local churches had long been established and held sentimental value for many of the supporters.  It would be hard to part with or recreate the same kind of rapport with new churches in Dallas when so many of Baylor’s alumni would only be able to relate to the church experiences they had while attending Baylor in Waco.   Dr.  Scarborough summed it up in this statement:

You cannot duplicate in Dallas for one half century if ever, the religious environment that Baylor has within the Seventh and James Church and the First Church, and all that holy atmosphere in which Baylor is enshrined and with which she has been glorified.  And I think this is one of the most precious assets and one of the most dynamic forces of Baylor.  I understand the religious life of S.  M.  U.  is nothing like what it is in Waco.  (Scarborough, L.  R., 1928, March 29, Letter to Brooks).

Conclusion

In a final agreement to keep Baylor University in Waco, the Waco Chamber of Commerce, on behalf of the local citizenry, agreed to support Baylor with the sum of $1,000,000 in donations.  Local church donations contributed to this amount as well as building constructions and land given by Waco for the expansion of the institution as Baylor continued to grow (The Dallas Morning News, 1928, n.p.).  The relocation committee decided that this sum created enough opportunity for Baylor to recover from debt and to stay and continue to build in Waco rather than relocate.  No more funds were promised from Dallas, and thus the argument to move dissolved.  To this end, Baylor’s residence was secured in Waco, and the promise of permanency appeased and encouraged the citizens of Waco.

Town and gown relationships hinge upon the degree to which both the town and the university can understand and collaborate with each other.  Support and loyalty from both parties can motivate efforts, but ultimately the fiscal needs of both must be met.  Baylor, even today, provides a strong economic support of the local Waco commerce and an educational avenue for her citizens.  The City of Waco has contributed property, monetary donations, business partnerships, and a strong moral support to the success and expansion of Baylor.  Through the support of individuals, organizations, and denominations in some cases, small towns can prove to be fertile grounds for large institutions of higher education because of their faithfulness and patronage to the institution.  As President Brooks stated, “Our campus is small, but we love it.  Great schools are not measured by the area of their campuses (Dallas Morning News, 1928, n.p.).” Seen as a possible weakness of Waco, her size did not inhibit her ability to make provisions for Baylor.  Waco’s people rallied their moral support and financial contributions to the cause of keeping Baylor in Waco and proved that small towns with a lot of heart and conviction can assemble to contribute to the effectiveness of a strong university-community relationship.

References

Belo, A.  H.  (1928, May 1) “Brooks voices opposition to Baylor move.” Dallas Morning News.  Samuel Palmer Brooks papers (Box 2C77, Folder #297).  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

Belo, A.  H.   (1928, May 3) “Body Opposing Baylor Moving Opens Office.” Dallas Morning News.  Samuel Palmer Brooks papers (Box 2C77, Folder #297).  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

Belo, A.  H.   (1928, May 11).  “Body decides on rejecting former offer.” Dallas Morning News.  Samuel Palmer Brooks papers (Box 2C77, Folder #297).  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

Belo, A.  H.   (1928, December 21) “Baylor Move Plan Revealed.” Dallas Morning News.  Samuel Palmer Brooks papers (Box 2C77, Folder #297).  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

Brooks, S.  P.  (1928 February 17).  [Address to Education Relocation Committee at their meeting in Waco].  Samuel Palmer Brooks papers (Box 2C77, Folder #295).  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

Brooks, S.  P.  (1928 February 27).  [Letter to Dr.  Scarborough].  Samuel Palmer Brooks papers (Box 2C77, Folder #295).  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

Brooks, S.  P.  (1928 May 1).  [Letter to Judge Newman].  Samuel Palmer Brooks papers (Box 2C77, Folder #295).  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

Brooks, S.  P.  (1928 April 21).  [Letter to Dr.  Scarborough].  Samuel Palmer Brooks papers (Box 2C77, Folder #295).  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

Committee of One Hundred of the Baptist General Convention of Texas.  [Baptist Bulwark].  BU Records: Greater Baylor Campaign (Box 1L170, Folder: Campaign).  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

Fisher, J.B.  (1930 December 18).  [First Baptist Church Donations].  BU Records: Greater Baylor Campaign (Box 1L174, Folder: Waco Assn.).  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

Finney, L.  E.  (1929 November 20).  [Report of the Greater Baylor Campaign Committee].  BU Records: Greater Baylor Campaign (Box 1L170, Folder: Minutes and Reports).  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

Finney, L.  E.  (1930 December 29).  [Minutes of the meeting of Greater Baylor Campaign Commission of One Hundred at First Baptist Church].  BU Records: Greater Baylor Campaign (Box 1L170, Folder: Minutes and Reports).  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

Greater Baylor University Campaign.  [Official Speakers’ Manual].  BU Records: Greater Baylor Campaign (Box 1L170, Folder: .  Campaign).  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

“IV.” Samuel Palmer Brooks papers (Box 2C77, Folder #297).  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.Lattimore, O.  S.  (1928 May 23).  [The Movement for the Perpetuation of Baylor University: Letter to Baptists].  BU Records: Greater Baylor Campaign (Box 1L170, Folder: Follow-Up).The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

Lovelace, C.  (1928 January 10).  [Letter to Samuel Palmer Brooks].  Samuel Palmer Brooks papers (Box 2C77, Folder #295).  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

Lovelace, C.  (1928 January 12).  [Letter to Samuel Palmer Brooks].  Samuel Palmer Brooks papers (Box 2C77, Folder #295).  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

Malone, L.  (1928 March 14).  [Letter to Samuel Palmer Brooks].  Samuel Palmer Brooks papers (Box 2C77, Folder #295).  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

 “Matter of survival for the private universities.” The Waco News-Tribune.  BU Records: Greater Baylor Campaign (Box 1L174, Folder: Waco Assn.).  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

Nash, J.  M.  [Waco Baptist Association Donations].  BU Records: Greater Baylor Campaign (Box 1L170, Folder: Minutes and Reports).  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

Penland, G.  H.  (1928 May 16).  [Letter to Brother Donath].  BU Records: Greater Baylor Campaign (Box 1L174, Folder: Waco).  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

Ray, J.  D.  (1928 May 3).  [Letter to Samuel Palmer Brooks].  Samuel Palmer Brooks papers (Box 2C77, Folder #297).  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

Roberts, M.  (1928 April 4).  “Additions to Baylor in Waco promised by Chamber Commerce.” The Baylor Lariat.  Retrieved from http://digitalcollections.baylor.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/lariat/id/10006/rec/1.  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

Roberts, M.  (1928 April 4).  “Baylor and Waco, Onward.” The Baylor Lariat.  Retrieved from http://digitalcollections.baylor.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/lariat/id/10006/rec/1.  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

Roberts, M.  (1928 April 4).  “Building a greater Baylor in Waco.” The Baylor Lariat.  Retrieved from http://digitalcollections.baylor.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/lariat/id/10006/rec/1.  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

Scarborough, L.R.  (1928 March 29).  [Letter to Samuel Palmer Brooks].  Samuel Palmer Brooks papers (Box 2C77, Folder #297).  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

Smyth, E.  B.  (1930 December 15).  [Letter to Reverend Dawson].  BU Records: Greater Baylor Campaign (Box 1L174, Folder: Waco Assn.).  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

Unknown.  [Baylor Student Pledges].  BU Records: Greater Baylor Campaign (Box 1L170, Folder: Minutes and Reports).  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

Whitlow, S.  (1928 November 6).  “’My Best for Baylor’ is Campaign Slogan.” The Baylor Lariat.  Retrieved from http://digitalcollections.baylor.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/lariat/id/10081/rec/1.  The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, TX.

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