Research Tracks

A publication of the Office of the Vice Provost for Research at Baylor University

May 8, 2014
by Baylor OVPR
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Upcoming event: CASPER seminar with Dr. Ernesto Gomez

The Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics and Engineering Research (CASPER) presents a lecture by Dr. Ernesto Gomez, professor of computer science and engineering at California State University San Bernardino.

“Shortcutting algorithms for fun, profit and science”

Screenshot 2014-05-08 15.07.11ABSTRACT
“Parallelism is the main source of speedup in computing, scientific and otherwise. For over thirty years the fastest supercomputers have been parallel machines, and for the last ten we have been seeing the same thing in commodity machines. So why are we still mostly parallelizing sequential algorithms? Do we think the best algorithms are always sequential? Actually we do – and have fairly solid arguments for that belief.

“In this talk, we point to the holes in the standard arguments using a counterexample: ‘shortcutting.’ We started from an analysis of what is different between sequential and concurrent execution and designed a method to take advantage of the differences.

“We have experimental results, more theory on where our methods could work (and where they probably won’t), and future directions.”

WHEN
Friday, May 9
2:30 p.m.

WHERE
Baylor Sciences Building (BSB)
Room C.105

MORE INFORMATION
Contact Sherri Honza at 254-710-1271 for more information.

April 24, 2014
by Baylor OVPR
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Upcoming event: CASPER seminar with Dr. Keith Schubert

The Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics and Engineering Research (CASPER) presents a lecture by Dr. Keith Schubert, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering in Baylor’s School of Engineering and Computer Science.

“Microbial engineers in space!”

CASPER Keith SchubertABSTRACT
“In resource constrained environments, microbial communities form highly structured patterns to optimize resource utilization. In this talk, Dr. Schubert will present his work studying and modeling their patterns, emphasizing microbial structures in both a sulfuric acid cave — Cueva del Villa Luz in Mexico, which will be the subject of an article in National Geographic Magazine this July — and biological soil crusts in the Mojave Desert. Applications to the search for life in the universe and climate change will also be discussed.”

WHEN
Friday, April 25
2:30 p.m.

WHERE
Baylor Sciences Building (BSB)
Room A.207

MORE INFORMATION
Contact Sherri Honza at 254-710-1271 for more information.

January 22, 2014
by Baylor OVPR
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Upcoming event: CASPER seminar with Dr. Jay Pulliam

The Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics and Engineering Research (CASPER) presents a lecture by Dr. Jay Pulliam, the W.M. Keck Professor of Geophysics in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences.

“Seafloor Seismology: Research and Technology Needs for Studies of the Solid Earth”

Pulliam-FlyerABSTRACT
“Studies of Earth’s structure and tectonic processes are hampered by a dearth of instruments that can be deployed on the seafloor. Since more than 75% of the planet is covered by water, and important structures, such as mid-ocean spreading centers and subduction zones reside in and beneath oceans, such limitations impede our understanding of the Earth as a whole.

“Fortunately, modern technology has resolved some previous shortcomings, such as a lack of stable clocks and batteries for long-term operation of autonomous seismic recorders, so a frontier of Earth science is about to open to prospectors. I will review the research needs that can only be satisfied by ‘campaign-style’ expeditions in the ocean basins or permanent seafloor observatories and show recent results obtained with autonomous ‘ocean bottom seismographs.'”

WHEN
Friday, Jan. 24
2:30 p.m.

WHERE
Baylor Research and Innovation Collaborative (BRIC)
Room 3160

MORE INFORMATION
Contact Sherri Honza at 254-710-1271 for more information.

September 10, 2013
by Baylor OVPR
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Baylor professor gives keynote at major international symposium

Dr. Tim Sheng, professor of mathematics and member of CASPER.

Dr. Tim Sheng is in England this month presenting his research and meeting with outstanding scholars from around the world at a trio of international conferences.

Dr. Tim Sheng, a professor of mathematics in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, presented a keynote lecture on computational mathematics this week at the 12th International Symposium on Distributed Computing and Applications to Business, Engineering and Science (DCABES 2013) in London, England.

Sheng, who is also a faculty member in Baylor’s Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics & Engineering Research (CASPER) gave a presentation entitled Modern ADI, LOD and adaptive decomposition algorithms for highly effective and efficient computations, in which he discussed the latest high performance computational strategies in sequential and parallel computations in multi-physics applications, as well as multiple scale distributions and splitting structures.

In addition to presenting at the DCABES symposium, Sheng’s itinerary also includes attending the New Mathematical Directions for Quantum Information conference at the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences and the International Conference on Particle Physics and Cosmology (COSMO 2013) at the Stephen Hawking Centre for Theoretical Cosmology in Cambridge.