American Archives Month: Alan Steelman and Optimism

In the 1970s, America underwent a period of political turmoil. After the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution in 1964, our military had become embroiled in an open-ended conflict on Vietnamese soil that was heavily protested at home and abroad, leading to civil unrest and anti-American sentiment. Bridges were being built across the racial divide between black…

Renovation, Innovation, and Ennervation

Class is back in session here at Baylor University, and that means the newest renovations to our beloved W.R. Poage Legislative Library building are nearing completion. Over the summer, we’ve been re-tooling the second floor into our brand-new Graduate Research Center (GRC). From the GRC website: The Graduate Research Center (GRC) is a space dedicated…

Staff Spotlight: Jeremy Schmuck

We’re starting a new series here at the Baylor Collections of Political Materials profiling our students and staff. To kick it off, we sat down with one of our newest additions: graduate student and intern Jeremy Schmuck. Tell us a little about yourself, Jeremy. I’m a native of Pensacola, FL, I have interests in military history,…

Congress Week, BCPM, and the ACSC

Today marks the end of our week-long look at the Bill of Rights. Last Friday, we wrote about Congress Week’s purpose and the Constitution’s continued influence on modern society. In that same spirit, today’s post discusses the Association of Centers for the Study of Congress’s (ACSC) mission to explore and archive America’s legislative branch. The…

W.R. Poage, Privacy, and the Ninth Amendment

The Ninth Amendment to the Constitution reads: The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people. This amendment ensures that the Constitution — and by extension, the federal government — is not the final arbiter of a citizen’s rights. The framers of the…

The Second Amendment, the NRA, and Jack Hightower

You might be surprised to learn that there are several “official” versions of the Second Amendment. One of these versions, passed by Congress, reads: A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed. Another version, ratified by…

School Prayer, the First Amendment, and Marvin Leath

The First Amendment to the Bill of Rights states: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances Plainly,…

Introducing BARD (Baylor Archival Repositories Database)!

Editor’s Note: This post was contributed by Amanda Mylin, Project Archivist at Baylor Collections of Political Materials. The Baylor Collections of Political Materials (BCPM)  is excited to introduce our newest tool for searching our collections: the Baylor Archival Repositories Database (BARD). Our finding aids can be located by searching in BARD. Finding aids are created…

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