Coffee reading and research

Depending on whether you heard the news over the summer, you may have been pleasantly surprised by the new addition to the Moody foyer when you arrived on campus this semester.  Yes, Moody Library is now proud to house a Starbucks coffee shop in our entrance.

 

If you’re a fan of all things java, here are a few other coffee-related library materials to give you some interesting reading while you’re downing your venti soy chai latte.

We’ve got a lot of books about coffee hidden in our stacks – just take a look at a few of the subject headings:

Here are some of the intriguing titles I found while searching through BearCat:
Allen, S. L. (1999). The Devil’s Cup: Coffee, the Driving Force in History. New York: Soho.
Fridell, G.  (2007). Fair Trade Coffee the Prospects and Pitfalls of Market-Driven Social Justice. Studies in comparative political economy and public policy. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
Hattox, R. S. (1985). Coffee and Coffeehouses: The Origins of a Social Beverage in the Medieval Near East. Near Eastern studies, University of Washington. Seattle: Distributed by University of Washington Press.
Parker, S. F., & Austin, M. W. (Eds.). (2011). Coffee: Philosophy for Everyone: Grounds for Debate. Philosophy for everyone. Chichester, West Sussex; Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
Schultz, H. (1997). Pour Your Heart into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time (1st ed.). New York, NY: Hyperion.
Weissman, M. (2008). God in a Cup: The Obsessive Quest for the Perfect Coffee. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.

If you’d like some solid statistics on coffee drinking to provide justification for the amount of time you will be spending in the Moody Foyer this semester, the library can also help you.  Check out the database called Proquest Statistical Insight and in the search box type “Subject: Coffee” for lots of great industry data, sales and market share indicators, agricultural production statistics and a whole lot more.

While you’re on a hunt for research, check out the database called Sociological Abstracts and do a search for the term “coffeehouses” and read up on all the fascinating ways the coffeehouse has contributed to social development all over the world.  Then think about what could happen to you this semester at Baylor, as you read your class assignments and do your own research while sipping a cup of joe at our new Starbucks in the library.

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