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How cool is that?

by Beth Farwell, Associate Director for Central Libraries

Did you hear about the recent national news story covering the opening of the time capsule in Boston? The capsule was first placed in the Massachusetts State House cornerstone in 1795 by Governor Samuel Adams, Paul Revere, and William Scollay. You can read the article or watch the video here at the Boston Globe.

Even if you aren't a history buff, opening time capsules are thought-provoking events. What was chosen for future generations to see? What conversations lingered into the wee hours while deciding what to add? What got left out of the box? What are the stories behind each item?

As Michael Comeau the executive director of the Massachusetts Archives stated "How cool, is that."

Very cool.

Far from Boston, Moody Library is home to several original items dated the same year the cornerstone was laid. The time capsule was put in place in Boston on July 4, 1795.
Earlier in March of 1795 an hour drive from Boston (or perhaps 11 hours walking), Eli Forbes preached a sermon in Gloucester titled “The importance of the rising generation.” Here is an image of the sermon's title page from the original 1795 copy housed in Moody Library.

Forbes sermon
Forbes sermon

You can read more of the sermon by visiting our webpage (http://www.baylor.edu/lib/CentralLib/index.php?id=97560) and make an appointment (call # = BX4253 .F67x)

A day after the cornerstone was laid in Boston, Morgan Rhees delivered a discourse in Greenville, Ohio to the American Army regarding peace and the treatment of Indians. Below, you can see Baylor's original copy of the title page and first page of the discourse.

Rhees discourse title page
Rhees discourse title page

 

 

 

Rhees discourse
Rhees discourse

 

Continue your research by visiting our webpage (http://www.baylor.edu/lib/CentralLib/index.php?id=97560) and make an appointment (call # = E93 .R46)

For a little more drama if we look across the pond to London England, Daniel Isaac Eaton printed and sold "The British tocsin; or, Proofs of national ruin." This 1795 printing followed his arrest and subsequent exoneration during the 1794 Treason Trials in England. This document has great potential for building your research with primary sources in colonial American and British histories. Moody Library houses the 2nd printed edition dated 1795.

Eaton
Eaton

View this document by visiting our webpage: https://www.baylor.edu/lib/centralspecialcollections/ (call # = DA35 .B7x 1795)

Baylor Libraries are excited to share these exceptional 220 year old treasures with you.

How cool is that!

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