How should I feel about Kitty?

Kitty is definitely another example of a character that is neither totally monstrous but not totally virtuous either. Kitty is presented as this worrying wife of a soldier at war. She is at the mercy of the effects of the war on her and her husband. Kitty Baldry is very classical in her outlook on life. Instead of the romantic optimism which Chris exhibits throughout the novel, Kitty’s life revolves around the “proper forms” of an upperclass performance. I am, however, compelled to sympathize with her because she is a woman who just married this man who is then sent off to war. War would be tough on anyone and to have to lament over whether or not your husband is going to return would drive anyone crazy. On top of that she also just lost her child at a very young age. This coupled with Chris’ return in which he doesn’t even remember her represents a loss of Chris as well. To have hope upon Chris’ return only to find out that you are not a part of his memories anymore gives me a reason to sympathize with her.

On the other hand, she is not totally blameless either. She is obsessed with self-control, good breeding, manners and making life tidy and comfortable. She even goes as far as to create a facade of happiness which she projects on Baldry Court. Baldry Court, is a mirror of Kitty, a woman of delicacy and refinement removed from the world and the war that had rocked it. She will do anything to keep her perfect little life intact even if it means not facing reality. Facing realty is a big theme in this book and eventually Kitty must be told about Margaret’s place in Chris’s life because she must understand that she was neither his first lover nor his most important one.  She must accept this in order to move on and help Chris.

In the end, I believe I sympathize with Kitty because she has been placed in a very hard situation and is simply trying to keep hope and her life intact. For example, Margaret receives a letter from Chris about his return, however, Kitty receives no such message about her husband’s imminent return, hearing about it secondhand from Jenny. Not receiving a letter, combined with Kitty’s discovery that Chris has experienced a partial memory loss, causes her great psychological stress and pain. It is almost as if she has lost her husband twice. Once upon his leave for war and again when he comes back a different man. This roller coaster of emotions would be taxing on anyone.

Who will prevail, Deception or Truth?

Lady Audley and Robert represent opposing forces that drive this story forward. The build up to the climax of the story is centered around the struggle between these two characters to gain an advantage over the other. Lady Audley’s power comes from her desperately trying to keep her identity a secret, while Robert’s power comes from his friendship with George and his determination to find the truth.

Lady Audley’s deception is made possible by her quick thinking and calculated strategy. She has great power in the fact that she is beautiful and charming and is capable of easily manipulating others as she needs. She has also managed to place herself in a very powerful position as the lady of Audley Court which gives her false stories more merit. While she has inherent power her power also relies on the assumptions and stereotypes she is able to play with. Because she seems beautiful and charming, people assume that she must be a good person, and it reflects the changing role of women in Braddon’s society. However, even when she is at her most powerful, Lady Audley cannot totally execute her deception. small clues keep falling through the cracks such as the way Alicia’s dog growls at her implying that her true nature cannot totally be hidden and the dog recognizes her character.

Robert on the other hand actually feels that women have too much power, and are capable of tricking and manipulating men. He recognizes the power women can wield and sees through Lady Audley’s secret. As he becomes more and more convinced that Lady Audley murdered his friend George and is now deceiving everyone about her true nature, Robert wonders whether all women are inherently deceitful and untrustworthy. He says “I hate women,” … “They’re bold, brazen, abominable creatures, invented for the annoyance and destruction of their superiors. Look at this business of poor George’s! It’s all woman’s work from one end to the other.” His speech about women, while negative, assigns them a great deal of power and agency and Robert does not think that women are frail, helpless, or unintelligent. Robert has been trained as a lawyer, but at the beginning of the novel he is not very motivated and lives a lazy lifestyle. Robert becomes so obsessed with the mystery of George’s disappearance, that his efforts to solve the case make him more focused, disciplined, and motivated.

It for these reasons that I think Robert now has the upper hand and holds the most power at this point.  Robert’s search to find his friend combined with his knowledge and new found determination seeks to unravel Lady Audley;s power of deception. I believe this determination stems from Robert’s friendship with George. It is precisely this relationship that causes him to mistrust Lady Audley gives him a powerful motive to find the truth over Lady’s Audley’s own motives for her deception. It is also interesting that while Lady Audley is the primary agent of deception in the novel, it turns out that she herself is being deceived the whole time. Luke allows her to believe that she has killed George; because he tricks her, he gains a great deal of power over her. In this way, I view Lady Audley as similar to a cornered beast. There is great power in her having her back against the wall and her being forced to do whatever is necessary to keep her secrets. However, she is still trapped and Robert is slowly closing her farther and farther into that corner until eventually, something has to give.

Why is Clara so important to the story?

Clara Talboys, the sister of George Talboys, is an example of a minor character who has a key role or moment in the story. She seems to be one of the only people who is suspicious about George’s death and plays the role of devil advocate in the story.  Clara gives off the impression of being very cold and reserved, but she can also be very passionate and strong-willed. This is seen when she tells Robert that if he does not find her brother’s murderer, she will do it herself. She is also very intelligent and realizes that something is not right with her brother’s disappearance and will stop at nothing to find the truth.

Clara’s role in the story really centers around Robert and George. Robert who was good friends with George falters in his search for George but Clara is always there to make sure he sees this through. Clara is the one who keeps the search for answers alive and always seems to keep Robert on his toes. Additionally, Robert is entranced by George’s sister Clara, who just so happens to look shockingly like George. This only adds to Robert’s fascination for her and he sees a lot of his friend in her. Clara’s passion for finding her brother is what spurs Robert on. Clara is also in possession of her brother’s letters which could prove to be a very valuable piece of evidence in their search.Clara therefore functions to fuel and drive others, specifically Robert, to avenge her brother. Without her persistence George may never be found, and her continued dedication to finding the truth. We might not really know how to feel about Clara since she is a minor character, but her beauty, her strong-will and dedication to her brother are all admirable characteristics. We can appreciate her love for her brother and how she will do anything for family. Her intelligence allows her to see around everyone lies and drives her search for the truth.

Clara therefore functions to fuel and drive others, specifically Robert, to avenge her brother. Without her persistence George may never be found, and her continued dedication to finding the truth. We might not really know how to feel about Clara since she is a minor character, but her beauty, her strong-will and dedication to her brother are all admirable characteristics. We can appreciate her love for her brother and how she will do anything for family. Her intelligence allows her to see around everyone lies and drives her search for the truth.

Why does Shelley make the telling of this story so complicated?

Through the use of point in the novel serve to manifest in us the character’s attitudes and emotions and offers many different sides to the narrative structure. A big portion of this is accomplished through texts, especially letters. These letters serve as a way to offer us another view point while really making the story more realistic and believable. Often time these stories are nestled within one another. For example, Walton’s’ frame tale envelops the entire story about Victor while the monster’s story is inside Victor’s story, who again has the story of the family in the cottage inside it. In this way, Shelley uses point of view to really add depth to the story and really allow us to connect with the main characters and understand their side.

A big example of this is the fact that while we get many points of view throughout the story it is focused on the main characters and their stories. Is allows us to really immerse ourselves in the story and choose how we feel about these characters. This is reflected in the many similar themes and feelings we see in Victor and his monster’s lives. For example, when Victor’s friend Henry is killed Victor is overwhelmed by the inhumanity of what has happened and it consumes him to the point of revenge. Victor seeks revenge on the monster for killing his loved ones experiencing the same loneliness that the monster is feeling when Victor refused to make him a mate. Both blame each other for their misfortunes and are driven by despair and utter loneliness towards an obsession for revenge. The monster’s earlier statements are now reflected in Victor’s speech, illustrating the extent to which Victor has become dehumanized. “I was cursed by some devil,” he cries, “and carried about with me my eternal hell.” This is similar to comments made by the monster after being repulsed by the cottagers: “I, like the arch fiend, bore a hell within me.” Driven by their hatred, Victor and his creation move farther and farther away from human society and sanity.

The final section of the novel, in which Walton continues the narrative, completes the framing story. Walton’s perception of Victor is one as a great, noble man ruined by many unfortunate events stemming from his mistake of abandoning his creation and really adds to the tragic conclusion. The technique of framing narratives within narratives allows the reader to hear the voices of all of the main characters, as well as providing multiple views of the central characters. Walton sees Frankenstein as a noble, tragic figure; Frankenstein sees himself as an overly proud and overly ambitious victim of fate; the monster sees Frankenstein as a reckless creator, too self-centered to care for his creation. Through point of view we see just how these characters feel about each other and we get a sense of why they are doing what they are. While most people see the monster as a hideous brute, the monster casts himself as a martyred classical hero: “I shall ascend my funeral pile triumphantly and exult in the agony of the torturing flames,” he says. At the end of the story we come across the monster one final time as he attempts to understand his place in the world. This final thought of the Monster finishing his story serves to represent the struggle we as readers feel to understand whether the monster really is a tragic victim or a truly evil being.

By receiving both Victor’s and the monster’s points of view we are able to fully understand what these characters are going through and it gives us the opportunity as readers to judge these two characters for ourselves and make our own decisions about who is just and whether their fates are deserved. Additionally, we are given Walton’s point of view to frame the story and present it in a way as if we are learning and judging these characters right alongside Walton. Walton serves as the connection between the story and the readers and it gives the story more reliability because the story is being told by a mostly unbiased observer.

What do Victor and his Monster hope to achieve by telling their stories?

One of the things that makes the story of Frankenstein so great is the use of story-telling in the book. Mary Shelley does a great job of changing the style in which she presents the story and it allows us to really immerse ourselves in the characters and their perspectives. The use of letters really makes the story and what the characters are saying more believable. Two great examples of this are the stories told by Victor to Walton and the Monster to Victor. While the idea of story-telling to convey past experiences remains the same in both instances the circumstances behind each story are very different. When we look at both stories we begin to see that while these two characters come from different pasts and experiences that lead to them needed to tell their story, the motives for telling them and the themes within their stories are very similar. When it comes to listening however, through his letters we see that Walton simply was a very lonely man looking for a companion who can match his intellect. Victor on the other hand, decides to hear out the monster because he feels guilty for what he and his creation has done and he wishes he had never created the monster in the first place.

The idea of the Monster eloquently telling his story shows that he is an emotional, talking, and sensitive almost human character outside of his grotesque appearance. At his core, he simply wants to be a part of society and not be seen as a monster.  This sense of belonging is a theme in both of these two stories as Victor too is isolated, but instead by his own ambition. Here is where we see a big difference between these two characters and their stories. Victor is someone who in his current situation solely because of his own power and his desire for knowledge while the Monster was simply an innocent soul thrown out into the world to fend for itself. The monster implores Victor to “remember, that I am thy creature: I ought to be thy Adam; but I am rather the fallen angel.” By comparing Victor to God, the monster heaps responsibility for his evil actions upon Victor, scolding him for his neglectful failure to provide a healthy environment.

Victor on the other hand, is found by Walton alone in the arctic. Victor sees a lot of himself in Walton and after some convincing, he decides to tell his story. I believe that he does this to offer some sort of warning to Walton. Victor realizing that Walton is going down the same path of obsession as him Victor recounts his tale in order to demonstrate his failures as a result of his obsession. I also get the sense however, that because Victor was never able to destroy his creation his story serves to warn others while at the same time imploring others to do what he could not. Similar to Victor, the Monster offers a warning of sorts by showing Victor that his fascination with Felix and Safie as well as their family comes from his desperate desire for Victor to accept him. For this reason, he asks for a female companion. He tells Victor that all of his evil actions have been the result of a desperate loneliness and in this way warns Victor that what has happened is his fault and it will continue unless Victor makes amends to the situation. This side of the Monster surprises Victor who now sees that what he has created in not only the result of some experiment gone wrong but is a living being with wants and needs who is now an intellectual threat. The monster continues to address Victor directly, throughout their conversation, keeping us in the moment of the storytelling and adding to the complicated structure of the novel. Quotes like “Unfeeling, heartless creator! You had endowed me with perceptions and passions, and then cast me abroad an object for the scorn and horror of mankind” serve not only to structure the story but also to demonstrate that the monster has a purpose in telling his story: he wants to elicit a reaction from Victor, a recognition of Victor’s responsibility for his disastrous plight. The monster’s account of the cottagers as kind and friendly reflects his desperate desire for companionship and affection.

The importance of language as a means of self-expression is expressed in these two stories. Each distinct narrative voice contributes to the novel’s woven web of allusions and biases. Here we see that storytelling in this story usually has a purpose behind it rather than simply recounting a past experience to a friend. Both Victor and the Monster are consumed by a search for knowledge that eventually leads them to their own isolation. The fact that both of these stories begin in arctic environments only furthers the idea that these stories are intertwined and the cold represents the cold shoulder or isolation of both of these characters.  In the case of the Monster, this realization comes from the idea that his appearance will never let him be a part of society. This isolation then leads to a desire for companionship. Both of these men however, are traumatized: The monster by Victor’s abandonment and Victor by his responsibility in two deaths. This drives both of them to seek to harm the other and make right the wrongs that have been done to them by the other.

What makes Fantomina special for her time?

Eliza Haywood satirizes several elements of 18th century society in this novel including men and women and their expectations in society or their view towards relationships. For Fantomina, the standards that are forced upon the woman is what is being satirized. When we encounter “the lady” in the theatre she is described as “A young lady of distinguished birth, beauty, wit and spirit.” In this way she represents a typical female of the 18th century as someone who in public, they must adopt a modest and mild exterior, but yet are still expected to please men in private. Fantomina’s actions are restricted by her reputation as a higher class Lady, as her public relations are constantly monitored and her eligibility to marry based upon virginity as well as status. In those days those maidens seen as virtuous would be rewarded with marriage, and those who lost their virginity were ‘persecuted’ by men.

Because she is a woman of high birth and social ranking she is unable to interact with the lower class part of the theatre but Haywood soon describes how she is different than most women of her time. Following the normal model for 18th century writing, the heroine is usually vulnerable and naïve and when we first see her admiring the attention the prostitutes were getting I imagined she was simply a rich heiress seeking attention. However, Fantomina goes on to be described as someone with “wit” and she observes how the prostitutes act and operate in society before becoming one of them, knowing fully what her actions mean. Fantomina manipulates what is expected of the female race; instead of exhibiting mildness and virtue, she must be celebrated for instead exhibiting an entertaining wit and ability to outsmart others. We can however, see additional similarities and differences when we see her transform herself into her other characters. For example, even when acting as a prostitute, Fantomina must still act with modesty because that is what she has been told to do her entire life. Again, when in the disguise of Celia, her body is ‘half-reluctant, half-yielding’, displaying the struggle that women faced in the expression of their desires. Fantomina becomes lower class in her appearance and her sexual freedom, but remains higher class in that she still doesn’t have to live in poverty.

Instead of coming from the privileged upper class perspective we see someone restricted by their status in the upper class and someone wishing to escape it. Therefore, the theme of class centers on movement between the classes, and not interaction within a class. Lowering herself to a lower class is thereby portrayed as positive to the reader, as it allows Fantomina the freedom she seeks. In the eighteenth century, your social status deemed your identity. Therefore, Fantomina would be judged on her status as a Lady. However, Haywood inverts this to suggest instead that class and social status is based on outward impressions, and not one’s blood.

Was does the Duke’s hatred of his late wife say about his character?

The Duke plays on the historical events surrounding the death of Alfonso, the Duke of Ferrara’s late wife in the 16th century. The Duke is presented during a time surrounding the Italian Renaissance and represents the wealthy people in Victorian society. During the Renaissance, wealthy and influential people exercised absolute power and unfortunately many of them, like the Duke, were morally corrupt. Like other Victorians that Browning may have encountered, the Duke sees sin lurking in every corner. The Duke’s wife, who represents a stark contrast to the character of the Duke, is presented as this bright light who was always happy and saw joy in everything she encountered. The Duke is angry because his wife is kind to everyone and always greets them with a smile. He believes these manifestations of her natural sexuality and charm to be an indication that she favors other men besides himself. This point in the poem is the where we see a turn from admiration of his wife to a complaint of her past actions and we get a look into the character of the Duke. We are told the single most important quality of a dramatic monologue is what the speaker reveals about himself or herself by their own words but because we only hear the musing of the Duke we must discover the pieces of the story ourselves. Through his examples of how he hates how his wife interacts with other we see his true nature. The Duke is a cruel, and jealous person who wishes to fix his wife’s female sexuality and mold her behavior. The most striking example of the Duke’s jealousy occurs in line 32-34 when he says she thanked other men “as if she ranked my gift of a nine-hundred-years-old name with anybody’s gift.” We how truly conceited the Duke is about his place in society and how angry he is that he is being treated just like anyone else by his wife. The Duke feels he is not being given the respect he deserves for simply being the Duke and we really see his sense of superiority towards those around him. This highlights two other key aspects of the Dukes character, his pride and arrogance. The Duke says that his wife needs to be “

We are told the single most important quality of a dramatic monolog is what the speaker reveals about himself or herself by their own words but because we only hear the musing of the Duke we must discover the pieces of the story ourselves. Through his examples of how he hates how his wife interacts with others, we see his true nature. The Duke is a cruel, and jealous person who wishes to fix his wife’s female sexuality and mold her behavior. The most striking example of the Duke’s jealousy occurs in line 32-34 when he says she thanked other men “as if she ranked my gift of a nine-hundred-years-old name with anybody’s gift.” We how truly conceited the Duke is about his place in society and how angry he is that he is being treated just like anyone else by his wife. The Duke feels he is not being given the respect he deserves for simply being the Duke and we really see his sense of superiority towards those around him. This highlights two other key aspects of the Duke’s character, his pride and arrogance. The Duke says that his wife needs to be “lessoned” however he then says something that can be seen as the single most important thing he says as a revelation of his character in lines 42 and 43. He states “E’en then would be some stooping; and I choose never to stoop.” This shows just how deep the Duke’s superiority goes and indeed rather than stoop to her level the story of his wife culminates in him stating he indirectly had her killed. Overcome with pride and jealousy he chose to kill her rather than deal with her imperfections.The struggle to mold people’s behavior to become a sophisticated and dignified member of society was a popular theme in Victorian society. However, through the poem we see that the Duke’s character and reasoning behind his wife killing goes much deeper than that. The way the poem is written makes us feel a sense of struggle, like he is carefully choosing what to say and feel him trying rein in his feelings for fear he may lose all control at any moment. In a very colorful way that masks the cruelty behind his words the Duke reveals his character to the audience and I get a feeling that he is a very insecure, unstable man who is full of jealousy. This jealousy is fueled by his complete superiority and arrogance and results in a very cruel man killing his wife to find another.

The struggle to mold people’s behavior to become a sophisticated and dignified member of society was a popular theme in Victorian society. However, through the poem, we see that the Duke’s character and reasoning behind his wife killing goes much deeper than that. The way the poem is written makes us feel a sense of struggle like he is carefully choosing what to say and feel him trying rein in his feelings for fear he may lose all control at any moment. In a very colorful way that masks the cruelty behind his words, the Duke reveals his character to the audience and I get a feeling that he is a very insecure, unstable man who is full of jealousy. This jealousy is fueled by his complete superiority and arrogance and results in a very cruel man killing his wife to find another.

Is Cruelty born from virtues of “The Divine Image”?

Throughout this poem, Blake personifies several human qualities the most striking of which is Cruelty. The poem starts out by stating that many of the common virtues we have come to attribute as divine characters are simply a result of the human capacity to create structures of belief and justify the existing order. In line 5 he states “And mutual fear brings peace, till the selfish loves increase;” showing that one would not exist without the other and these virtues stem from a darker opinion of moral and social issues. The narrator doesn’t see these traits as holy virtues and argues that in a perfect world there would be no need for the virtues. Humans shouldn’t be forced into sympathy and an obligation to help others if the world were truly full of love and happiness.

In line 7 however the poem takes a turn when he says, “Then Cruelty knits a snare, and spreads his bait with care.” It is here that we see the dark side of these virtues and how they relate to cruelty. Cruelty is born from the ashes of these so called ideals as a rift is created between those on one side or the other of this moral high ground these virtues create.  Cruelty is depicted as a cunning person baiting everyone with this tree of life. Here Blake explores the harmful and damaging growth of this system of values that is based on the misery of other and our “selfish loves” (line 6). Cruelty “sits down with holy fears, and waters the ground with tears.” (Lines 9-10) The tree, just like hatred in our society, thrives off of the fear and suffering of others. It is rooted in humility and provides shelter to the Raven, a symbol for death. Like the other human qualities that glorify those bearing these divine qualities and places blame of those in need, cruelty “bears the fruit of Deceit,” (Line 17) and is foliated by mystery.

In lines 23 and 24 it is revealed that the personification of cruelty and this tree that grows from it is actually a description of the human brain.  We are given a glimpse into how the human mind works and how experiences shape our norms. Here we find what I believe to be Blake’s main critique. That through our constant abstract thinking we try to rationalize the world around us and place our hopes in false truths. We try to justify ourselves by giving meaning to our actions and conforming to ideals that are virtuous and belong to something bigger than ourselves. In this way, these ideals undermine the natural order of the world and both cruelty and these virtues work to keep things the way they. They keep those at the bottom in the dark and praise those at the top but in the end, all that results is a twisted form of nature that grows within ourselves. By framing these ideas this way Blake places emphasis on the true culprit of the poem, ourselves.

What has happened to the England of old and where is our savior?

Wordsworth presents as someone who is unhappy about the character of contemporary England and is wallowing in his memories of how great England used to be. In the first octave he is worried that the country has forgotten its past successes, and lost pride in what used to make it great. Wordsworth is concerned about the country’s loss of traditional values and strengths that once made the country so great. He certainly loves his country, but is worried by what he sees happening to his countrymen, from both moral and cultural perspectives. In lines 3-4 there are several symbols of England’s past glories. “Altar” represents the English church, and “fireside” stands in for the security and pride once felt in England during their reign of power. We also have “sword” representing the British military, and “pen” indicating the entire English literary tradition. He longs for days past, when Englishmen were free, courteous, accomplished, and powerful, however, he believes those days are long gone. In the sestet Wordsworth points out that the people of England need a savior to step up and inspire them to greatness once more. That savior comes in the form of poet John Milton but unfortunately he’s dead. In line 7, Wordsworth speaks to Milton, begging him to return from the dead and help England find itself again. He attributes an almost divine quality to Milton, who he describes as both a poetic and moral force. In line 9 he uses a simile to compare Milton to a star who shone brighter than the all the rest. He abandons his attack on England, and perhaps grows a little giddy in his praise of Milton. He ends the poem with praise of Milton’s greatness, and he doesn’t return to the initial theme of England’s decline. The moral at the end of the story points to the fact that we {England} should strive to be more like Milton in our character and our work.

How does Milton utilize a narrator and Adam’s perspective to reflect on humans thirst for knowledge through his account of the story of Genesis?

Milton’s use of the narrator allows him to offer a different perspective to the story, while being able to say things that might not be possible without a narrator. In this way we are able to see Adam’s inner thoughts and get some sort of explanation into his actions, and Milton is able to put his own spin on the well-known stories of the bible. The narrator presents Adam as someone who has great desire learn able to world around him and how he came to be. The narrator says, “The doubts that in his heart arose and now led on, yet sinless, with desire to know what nearer might concern him, how this world of Heav’n and Earth conspicuous first began.” This shows how Adam begins to question his reality and his purpose for being placed on Earth. His growing desire for knowledge and to discover more about himself represents the curiosity found human nature. He demonstrates our insatiable desire to continue to learn and shape the world around us. In this way Adam is made to represent in a way the dangers of discovery and pegs the question: Is it better to know or is ignorance bliss? The story shifts to Adam’s perspective and we see Adam not as a simple man searching for answers but to someone with genuine curiosity and a desire to learn from his creators. Like human kind, his desire has become unstoppable and he approaches Raphael with a cautious but inquisitive questioning. Adam says, “If unforbid thou may’st unfold what we, not to explore the secrets ask of his eternal empire but the more to magnify his works the more we know.” This shows how Adam while having reverence for his creators simply wants to learn more about them in order to serve them better. This goes along with the teachings of the bible and how we must know God in order to serve him and for him to work through us. In this way Milton is able to relate the story of Genesis to the thoughts and desires of humans by giving us the perspective of Adam. Milton also expertly uses the narrator by allowing us to see the divine and holy creations in more human terms. Adam’s growing thirst for knowledge foreshadows his temptations to eat from the Tree of Knowledge and highlights mankind’s tendencies toward both good and evil in the search for knowledge.

To what extent are Sebastian and Antonio vile and greedy?

In Act 2 scene 1 Antonio and Sebastian are seen as cynical characters who do not care about others or seem to be frightened by the situation they are in. This is seen in their dry description of the island and while Gonzalo is simply happy to have survived the wreck these two seem to be annoyed by the inconvenience of it all. This all takes a turn for the worst when the two plot to kill Sebastian’s brother Alonso. It is revealed and is ironic that Alonso was the one who helped Antonio overthrow Prospero and now he is helping Alonso’s own brother do the same. Sebastian says going along with Antonio’s plan, “Thy case, dear friend, Shall be my precedent; as thou got’st Milan, I’ll come by Naples. Draw thy sword: one stroke Shall free thee from the tribute which thou payest; And I the king shall love thee.” Their plan is unjustified as Alonso seems to be the only one to repent for past mistakes and their only plan is to claim the power for their own just as Antonio did. The hurriedness and boldness of their plan demonstrates how the two characters are foolish and clumsy in their desire for power and it seems like there is no end to their madness. Antonio is cast in a brash and power hungry light but he seems to be the worst of the two and the mastermind behind it all as he is the one trying to goat Sebastian into completing the dastardly deed. While Sebastian himself longs for power and is easily persuaded to kill his own brother he himself is not smart enough to actually go through with it and his fake story about the lions when the two are discovered only adds to how foolish Sebastian and his plan seems. The two characters together represent two people unfit to hold a position of power as they are cowardly and aggressive in their desire for power.