Tag Archive for Baylor Lariat

(Digital Collections) From the First Issue to Last Semester: The Newly Expanded “Baylor Lariat” Digital Archive!

Lariat_complete_headerIf you’re a regular reader of this blog, you’re probably wondering where we’ve been the past month or so. Well, it’s been a long time coming, but we’ve been laboring over a major project and have returned today to announce a major addition to the Baylor Lariat digital collection. For the first time ever, every issue from 1900 to the most recent completed academic semester (Fall 2015) is available in one place: The Lariat Digital Archive!

“But wait,” you may be saying to yourself. “I thought they were all already in one place? What gives?” To which I would answer: “Oh, ho, ho! But the ‘born digital’ era Lariats were NOT previously part of this collection. They lived in a separate online archive attached to the Baylor Lariat website. In fact, any issue from Fall 2006 to the present wasn’t in our Digital Collections at all … UNTIL NOW.”

Your reaction to this news, probably.

Your reaction to this news, probably.

 

That’s why it’s been a month since we posted, gentle readers: I’ve been up to my eyeballs in the process of prepping files for loading, scanning missing pages, generating metadata and loading almost a thousand issues of The Lariat from Fall 2006 to Fall 2015 into our digital collections, and that’s a process that takes a little focused attention. So please excuse our lateness, but we hope you’re as excited as we are to be able to find gems like these all in the comfort of a single digital platform!

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An ad for Nautica Jeans Co. from the first all-digital edition of The Lariat, August 29, 2006

 


 

 

Screen Shot 2016-03-01 at 4.29.15 PMArticle about the opening of the Riley Digitization Center, featuring our Assistant Director and yours truly operating our original Kirtas APT-2400 digital book imager (RIP)

 


 

 

Screen Shot 2016-03-02 at 10.37.19 AMCover of the April 4, 2012 issue documenting the Lady Bears’ NCAA national championship and 40-win perfect season. #sicem

 


 

 

Screen Shot 2016-03-02 at 10.41.32 AMIssue commemorating the tenth anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.

 


 

Screen Shot 2016-03-02 at 10.44.36 AMEditorial cartoon depicting the embattled tenure of former BU president John Lilley, shown as a dodgeball player attempting to avoid a number of controversial stories dogging his administration.

 


 

Screen Shot 2016-03-02 at 10.53.50 AMFirst issue of Fall 2014 semester, the inaugural year of McLane Stadium’s term as home of Baylor Bear football.

 


 

Screen Shot 2016-03-02 at 11.03.47 AMA nifty piece of “will the latest technology kill you with radiation?” illustrated for the October 19, 2007 issue.

There’s so many more great moments in this set of materials, and you can see them all at this link. We encourage you to take a look at these important resources, and take advantage of the increased accuracy of keyword searchability that comes from the source material being “born digital.” Happy reading!


Special thanks to our friends at Student Publications – Julie Freeman and Paul Carr – for their invaluable help in gaining access to these resources. Be sure to visit the Lariat’s website for this semester’s issues!

 

 

(Digital Collections) “Sound in Collections” Episode 3: Giving “Pie Man” The “Serial” Treatment

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By now, you’ve likely heard of the NPR-based podcast Serial, a weekly serialization of an investigation into a 1999 murder case in Baltimore, Maryland. Journalist Sarah Koenig narrates the This American Life spinoff that has become a cultural phenomenon, spawning hotly contested activity across the Internet (most notoriously on a very active subreddit) and its own meta-podcasts where people dissect the way the original podcast was created. It is endlessly listenable, and highly worth your time. At its heart is the human need to dive into a complex story where no one is a clear-cut hero, and only the victim is easily identified.

Inspired by this 21st century investigation into a 20th century crime, I decided to launch an investigation of my own into something documented in the pages of The Lariat, our campus newspaper. It comes from the December 8, 1988 edition, and it deals with a sneak attack by an entity (or entities?) known as Pie Man. Obviously, it’s not nearly as serious as the topic covered by Serial, but it has enough mystery, late-1980’s flair and lingering questions that I thought it would be fun to see what we can discover about a spate of dessert-based sneak attacks that plagued the campus in the waning years of the Reagan administration. (Potential spoiler: President Reagan visited campus in September 1988, the first event held at the Ferrell Center. The event outlined below took place in December 1988. Coincidence? [Probably.])

Our latest edition of the “Sound in Collections” podcast explores the Pie Man saga in the instantly familiar tone of an episode of Serial. We hope you’ll enjoy it – and that Sarah Koenig, Ira Glass et al. will see it with the obvious love and respect with which it was created. Enjoy!

Click Play in the window below to play the episode, or click the down arrow to download the MP3.

Additional Resources

The Original Story

The best documentation of the “Pie Man” saga comes via a story in The Lariat written by reporter Preston Smith. We’ll reproduce it here verbatim so you get a full sense of the magnitude of the events in question.

Pie Man hits man in class

By Preston Smith, Lariat Reporter

A man entered a class in the Hankamer School of Business at about 11:15 a.m. Wednesday and struck a student in the face with a pie, Chris Colihan, a student in the class said.

The man had long, black curly hair and was wearing a concert T-shirt.

The institution of the Pie Man was assumed over when Baylor police apprehended him in a sting operation earlier in the semester.

Colihan said he was in Professor Leslie Rasner’s Business Law 3305 class when he heard the door to the class open. He said the assailant came into the room, shouted an expletive at a student, hit him in the face with a pie and then ran out of the room.

Jim Wyatt, the student who fell victim to the new Pie Man, said that the incident happened so fast he never saw his attacker.

“I was just sitting in class looking at my notes when I heard this guy say ‘hey’ and then I looked up into a pie,” he said.

Wyatt said the pie was all over his face and glasses, so he went to the restroom to clean up.

Witnesses said the class was laughing about the incident when Wyatt left the room, but the Pie Man would soon strike again.

When Wyatt went to the restroom, he still could not see because of the cream covering his face, so he was not ready for the Pie Men waiting for him in the bathroom.

The assailants struck him with several more pies, but he still never saw the attackers, he said.

Rasner said Wyatt came back into the room and said, “There was more of them in the bathroom.” Wyatt was completely covered in pie cream, he said.

At this point, several students ran to the bathroom to catch the pie men but found the bathroom empty. Wyatt gathered his books and went home, Rasner said.

The class was just beginning to settle when the Pie Man made a third appearance.

The class heard running in the hall, and then the Pie Man opened the door, stuck his head into the class, and yelled, “Hey Gina, you’re next,” Rasner said. Students in the class immediately ran out the door in pursuit of the man, he said.

Steven Spoonemore, a student who chased the Pie Man, said the assailant was already out of the building when he entered the hall. Spoonemore and the other students ran out separate doors to the outside of the building and saw the Pie Man running to a get-away car parked behind the business school.

Spoonemore chased the Pie Man to the other side of the car. The Pie Man shouted at the girl driving the car to “move over” and then got into the driver’s seat of the car, Spoonemore said.

Spoonemore said that Larry Vasbinder, another student involved in the chase, was trying to get into the passenger side of the car, while he forced his way into the driver’s seat with the Pie Man.

“I jumped into the car and turned it off twice, but I wasn’t able to get the keys out of the ignition,” he said.

Spoonemore said the Pie Man was screaming at him, and the woman in the car was screaming at him and hitting him.

Chris Moseley, another witness to the incident, said Spoonemore stayed in the car until it ran a stop sign at about 20 mph. He then pushed himself out of the car and rolled several times on the street.

After the episode, students had mixed reactions to the Pie Man. Wyatt, who said he had “no idea” who was behind the plot, brushed the incident off as a joke.

“I’m kind of laughing about it now,” he said. “It tasted pretty good anyway.”

Gina Gee, the woman whom the Pie Man threatened in class, said, “It really upset me. I have no connection with the guy who got it in the first place.”

Rasner had stronger feelings on the Pie Man. “If I had a deadly weapon I would use it in my defense,” Rasner said. “It is embarrassing. It is degrading. This just should not go on in a university – it is past a joke.”

The Baylor Department of Public Safety was contacted on the incident but the director could not be reached for comment.

A Timeline of the Events of Fall 1988, the “Autumn of Pie Man”

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Read All Issues of the Lariat with “Pie Man” Related Content

 

 

(Digital Collections) A Century of Daily Baylor History, Now Online: The “Lariat” Digital Collection

The “Lariat” digital collection spans the entire 20th century and beyond

If you follow us on Facebook, you’ll recall a few weeks ago that I teased some “big news” was forthcoming. Well, the wait is over, and we’re excited to announce that thanks to the efforts of the Digitization Projects Group, The Texas Collection and the office of Student Publications, the entire run of the Baylor University Lariat is now available online via the Baylor University Libraries Digital Collections.

From the inaugural issue of November 8, 1900 to the present, users around the world can now access every issue of the Lariat from the comfort of their own homes. Issues from 1900 to 2006 are available in our Digital Collections, while issues from 2007-present are available from the Lariat’s website.

You may have seen some media coverage about this collection thanks to articles in the Lariat and the Waco Tribune Herald, but we wanted to give you some more information here, via our blog, about just what went into the creation of this major collection.

Planning and Process

The process began about three years ago with very early, test scans of bound volumes of the Lariat dating back to the early 1900s. We used our Zeutschel planetary scanner to handle the digitizing and found the process of manipulating bound volumes to be slow and cumbersome. With the addition of the Cruse large-format scanner – and permission from The Texas Collection’s director to unbind the volumes – we made much better progress. In fact, a skilled operator could digitize ten issues of the Lariat two pages at a time on the Cruse, a dramatic increase in efficiency that allowed us to complete the digitization of more than 11,000 issues of a newspaper collection in about a year and a half.

This staggering amount of content is the primary reason most universities choose to either avoid digitizing the full run of their campus newspaper or outsource the job to mass digitization companies. We chose to keep the process internal so as to avoid shipping irreplaceable copies of the Lariat off-site, as well as exercising full control of the metadata creation and collection curation process.

As with all of our digital collections, high-resolution preservation copies of the files were created and stored on our preservation server, and access-friendly PDFs of the issues were created and ingested into our CONTENTdm system. “Skeletal” metadata – basics like date, editor name and page count – were added to all items as they were ingested; later additions to the records include listing headlines for each issue, names of Lariat staff members, and the price per issue.

The Collection’s Impact

Digitizing a century’s worth of the campus newspaper was no small undertaking, and the decision to handle the process in-house from start to finish meant a significant investment in infrastructure, hardware and staff time. But none of those potential obstacles were significant enough to deter us from our goal of giving instant access to the wealth of information available in the pages of the Lariat. Now, scholars around the world can delve into the daily details of campus life, social commentary and world events as seen through the eyes of Baylor University’s student reporters.

Keyword searching makes the collection’s entry points as diverse as the English language. The ability to restrict a search to a single point in time – a year, a month, a decade – makes browsing from issue to issue not only manageable but enjoyable. The ability to zoom in on photos and paragraphs of text makes navigation and closer examination a breeze. And of course, access via the Internet makes it possible for everyone to use the collection, not just those with the ability to travel to the Baylor campus.

We look forward to seeing the ways our users dissect, synthesize and utilize the information in the Lariat collection. If you find something fascinating, earthshaking or downright bizarre in the thousands of pages therein, drop us a line at digitalcollectionsinfo@baylor.edu and tell us about it. Who knows? We might even feature your find in a future blog post (with your permission, of course!).

The digital Lariat collection is available at www.baylor.edu/lib/lariats. The Digitization Projects Group, The Texas Collection and Student Publications collaborated to create this collection.