Research Ready: October 2012

Each month, we post a processing update to notify our readers about the latest collections that have finding aids online and are primed for research. Here’s the scoop for October:

Mary and Oscar Du Congé at work

Mary and Oscar Du Congé at work. Their papers document their work, family, and social life in Waco, Texas.

Bolt Family Homestead and Legion Valley massacre scrapbook photo, 1985

Dr. Johnie Reeves at a vista overlooking the Colorado River and the Comanches’ route after the Legion Valley massacre of 1868. Legion Valley is on the other side of the Cedar Mountains in the distance.

  • William Carley Family Collection, 1834-1936, undated: Documenting the Carley family from 1836-1936, this collection includes records about William Carley’s experiences moving to Texas in 1836, his service in the United States-Mexican War, and other events in the life of the family.
  • Oscar “Doc” Norbert and Mary “Kitty” Jacques Du Congé Papers, 1908-1987: This archives consists of manuscripts pertaining to the lives of Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Du Congé. Oscar  was the first African-American Mayor of Waco, and his wife, Mary, was a schoolteacher and secretary who was a leader in the community, a socialite, and a volunteer member of many Catholic religious organizations.
  • Wilhelm Esch Collection, 1870-1943: This collection contains certificates of  appointment and of honorable discharge for German-American soldier Wilhelm Esch, photographs and books concerning military life in World War I, items related to the Order of the Elks and miscellaneous WWII items including ration books.
  • Guyler (Lydia Ann English) [Mrs. William] Papers, 1860:  A correspondence between
    Mrs. Lydia A. Guyler (Mrs. William) from General Sam Houston, in response to Mrs. Guyler’s request for Houston to name her daughter.
  • Adolf Hitler Papers, 1938-1943: Our Hitler Papers contain two documents signed by the Chancellor of the Third Reich, Adolf Hitler.
  • Benjamin Judson Johnson Papers, 1942-1960: These papers include correspondence, legal documents, literary productions, and artifacts relating to Benjamin’s experience in the U.S. Naval Air Force during World War II.
  • Jones Family Papers, 1857-1867, 1920, undated: The Jones family records consist of correspondence, legal, and financial documents, including fourteen Civil War letters from family members in the 10th Texas Infantry.
  • Luper Family Papers, 1909-1990: The Luper Family Papers are comprised of correspondence, literary productions, and other materials pertaining to a Baptist missionary family and their experiences during the mid-1900s in Portugal, Brazil, and central Texas. (This finding aid is updated with additional materials that came to The Texas Collection after we initially announced the finding aid in June 2012.)
  • Harry Hall Womack, Jr. Papers, 1940-1948: Womack’s papers consist of correspondence and literary productions relating to his experiences in the 1940s. These include medical school, a tour as a doctor in the Army during World War II, and the beginnings of his marriage and family.
This entry was posted in 10th Texas Infantry Regiment, Adolf Hitler, African-Americans, Albert Luper, Baptist history, Baptist missions, Baptist women, Baylor at Independence, Baylor University, Bolt Family Homestead, Brazil, Camp MacArthur, Civil War, Confederate States of America, diaries, Fannie Mae Luper, First Baptist Church Oak Cliff Dallas, Fred Gildersleeve, Frontier and pioneer life, Georgia Jenkins Burleson, German-Americans, Germany, Granbury's Texas Brigade, Harry Hall Womack Jr., Historic Waco, Indians of North America, Kentucky National Guard, Legion Valley Massacre, letters, Llano County, Lydia Ann Guyler English, Mary "Kitty" Jacque Du Congé, Mexican War 1846-1848, military history, missionaries, missions, Oscar "Doc" Norbert Du Congé, Otto Georg Thierack, Portugal, Reconstruction, Research Ready, Rufus Burleson, Sam Houston, Slavery, Texas Catholics, Texas governors, Texas Mayors, United States Air Force, United States Navy, University of Texas Medical Branch-Galveston, Waco race relations, Woman pioneers, World War I, World War II. Bookmark the permalink.

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