Semper (Hi-) Fi: Marine Corps Command and Staff College Utilizes High-Resolution Images from Digitization Projects Group for Officer Training

In June of this year, Lt. Col. Shawn Callahan of the U.S. Marine Corps Command and Staff College contacted the Digitization Projects Group with an exciting request. As part of his planning for a major training course for officers from all branches of the United States military, Callahan was trying to find maps of the 1862 Peninsular Campaign, which had been led by U.S. Gen. George B. McClellan against the Army of Northern Virginia, led by Gen. Robert E. Lee. A Google search led him to our Digital Collections, which includes a fully searchable, freely accessible copy of the “War of the Rebellion Atlas,” the definitive source for maps related to the U.S. Civil War.

Callahan’s idea was to use primary resources derived from the campaign – particularly maps – to pose this problem to his students: based only on the information available to McClellan at the time, how would you have planned and conducted this campaign?

After finding what he needed in our “War of the Rebellion Atlas” collection, Callahan contacted the DPG to request high-resolution versions of the maps that he could then print out and provide as reference materials for his students. Of course, we were eager to help and readily provided Callahan with the maps he requested. Digital Collections Consultant Eric Ames also worked to identify other maps that embraced the time, place, and force outlays related to the campaign, ultimately providing 30 images to Callahan for use in the course.

The training was held in late September, with members of the Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force and international officers from 28 nations participating. These photos show the officers consulting large-format printouts of the maps as they formulated their strategy for the Peninsular Campaign.

(1)

We received a letter of appreciation from Col. Royal P. Mortenson, Director of the College, expressing his thanks for providing access to the high-res files, as well as our efforts to support “an educational initiative which has sharpened our military leaders and will help maximize their contributions to our national defense.” He went on to say, “Your efforts to coordinate access to Baylor University’s digital archives for the Command and Staff College faculty were instrumental to the success of this exercise.” (2)

From everyone at the DPG – and on behalf of our colleagues at the Texas Collection, where the pristine original copy of the “Atlas” is preserved – we want to thank the fine men and women of the U.S. Marine Corps for allowing us to participate in this exercise, and we are proud of the opportunity to help support their efforts to keep our country safe.

Semper Fi, and Sic ‘Em, Bears!

You can view the entire “War of the Rebellion Atlas” in our Digital Collections, located at http://contentdm.baylor.edu.

(1) Photos courtesy Lt. Col. Shawn Callahan
(2) Letter from Col. Royal P. Mortenson to Eric S. Ames, 10/7/2011

A new way to connect, coming soon

Welcome to the official blog of the Baylor University Digital Collections! In the coming weeks, you’ll find enhanced content, relevant context, and plenty of useful info on our digital collections here. We look forward to introducing you to our one-of-a-kind content soon!

Frances G. Spencer Collection of American Popular Sheet Music & Black Gospel Music Restoration Project: A Comparison

Amanda Harlan presented at the Music Library Association Annual Meeting, Wednesday, March 24th. She did a comparison of the metadata workflow between two major digital music collections at Baylor University: the Frances G. Spencer Collection of American Popular Sheet Music and the Black Gospel Music Restoration Project. She wanted to show the similarities and differences that an audio collection has with a sheet music collection. The presentation covers four main points: 1. What type of staff does the metadata creation work and how are they trained; 2. What legacy metadata is re-used and enhanced in the project; 3. What technologies and systems are used for the metadata creation and quality control processes; and 4. What metadata formats are involved and how the selection was made?

Link to Presentation: http://tinyurl.com/y27tdo3

I think we all have our ministries, but gospel music is such a compelling ministry, because souls don’t come in cultures Lea Gilmore