Feeding Our Nostalgia: A Sampling of Waco’s Favorite Former Restaurants, Via the BU Libraries Athletics Archive

Although the temperatures outside our offices here on campus don’t reflect it yet, the calendar says we’ve officially entered fall. And with its arrival come the requisite things we love about autumn like changing leaves, cooler days, and a tidal wave of foods flavored with pumpkin and cinnamon.

But nothing says “fall” on a university campus like the return of college football, and as our Baylor Bears are riding a 3-game winning streak this week, we thought it fitting to turn our attention to our Baylor University Libraries Athletics Archive (BULAA) for inspiration for this week’s post.

And so it was that while perusing football programs from the 1930s-1980s, I stumbled upon a recurring theme: the ads for restaurants that don’t exist in Waco anymore. Be they beloved staples mourned to the present or mere one-time wonders barely remembered by anyone, they still took the time to invest in advertising space in programs for Baylor home football games, so their impact on our university was easily measure in terms of ad revenue and column inches – if only for a season.

We thought it might be fun to showcase a few of those ads and, as a bonus, add their locations to a custom Google map so you can see exactly where they were located “back in the day.” Longtime Wacoans may well remember dining at some of these establishments; likewise, newer residents (or those just passing through town) can gain a better understanding for our fair city’s historic culinary offerings.

Leslie’s Chicken Shack (from November 24, 1934 game vs. SMU)

Jack’s Café (from October 23, 1948 game vs. Texas A&M University)

Pat Rutherford’s (from November 11, 1950 game vs. University of Texas)

Taco Patio and Mr. Chuc Wagun (from November 12, 1977 game vs. Rice University)

The Water Works (from November 22, 1980 game vs. University of Texas)

This is just a sampling from the smorgasbord (sorry!) of eatery ads to be found in the football programs of the BULAA. We hope you’ll take time to look through the programs for your favorite Waco restaurants, and take a minute to leave us a comment on your fondest food memories. Bon appetit!

Loan, Give, Tip: How Your Materials Can Become a Part of Our Collections

Materials from the S.E. Tull Collection of historic Baptist sermons

One of the most rewarding parts of our work in the DPG is knowing that our efforts will lead to better exposure for Baylor’s unique collections and a better understanding of the world in which we live. The materials housed in Baylor’s special collections provide ample resources for a career’s worth of output, but there are times when even our enviable collections could benefit from some outside augmentation.

That’s where you come in.

Several of our major projects are at their best when they’re aided by you, our users and supporters. One important way is through lending or outright gifting of materials to either the Digitization Projects Group directly, or indirectly through our campus special collections partners.

Lending or Donating to the Digitization Projects Group

Our two biggest ongoing projects that can most benefit from your help are the Black Gospel Music Restoration Project (BGMRP) and the Baylor University Libraries Athletics Archive (BULAA). While very different in content, they both operate on the same principle: we’re digitizing as much material as we can find that fits our criteria, and we know that a substantial portion of it lives off-campus. If you – or someone you know – is a collector of black gospel music or Baylor sports memorabilia, you can lend or donate materials to our group for digitization and inclusion in our digital collections. (See the end of this post for contact information on how to lend or give to the DPG.)

Donating to Our Partners

If you’d like your materials to have a permanent home at one of Baylor’s special collections or institutions, you can contact them to arrange for a meeting with a representative who can appraise and research your materials for possible inclusion in their collections. Then, if they make good candidates for digitization, we’ll work with our liaisons at the special collections to queue them up for digitizing and uploading. (See the end of this post for contact information on how to lend or give to our special collections partners.)

Tips

Know someone who has a large collection of Civil War letters? How about antique maps or black gospel albums from the 1950s? If you do, and you think they’d like to contribute to our work, send them the link to our digital collections homepage, pass along our email address (digitalcollectionsinfo@baylor.edu) or have them stop by the Moody Memorial Library on campus and meet with us. We rely on word-of-mouth and user tips from people who collect materials we’re digitizing to help us create larger, more complete digital collections.

So take a minute to peruse your bookshelves or filing cabinets, give that obsessive collector a call, or take an extra minute to look through the gospel section of the used record store for things that might help us create a bigger, better digital collection. We’ll even make sure to list you as the custodian or lender if you’d like to see your name in our records!


The Digitization Projects Group
ATTN: Eric Ames
Baylor University Libraries
One Bear Place #97148
Waco, TX 76798-7148

The Black Gospel Music Restoration Project
ATTN: Denyse Rodgers
Baylor University Libraries
1312 S 3rd Street
Waco, TX 76706

The Texas Collection
http://www.baylor.edu/lib/texas
or txcoll@baylor.edu

Armstrong Browning Library
http://www.baylor.edu/lib/abl
or Rita_Patteson@baylor.edu

W.R. Poage Legislative Library
http://www.baylor.edu/lib/poage
or Poage_Library@baylor.edu

The DPG Team: An Essential Primer

The Team (from left): Darryl Stuhr, Allyson Riley, Eric Ames, Austin Schneider and Stephen Bolech

After one of our previous posts went viral, exposing us to a much larger audience, we decided it would be a good time to formally introduce our team to the world. So, without further ado, meet the folks who scan, curate, digitize, import, outreach, and generally save the world, one scan at a time.

  1. When did you join the DPG? The day it was created.
  2.  What degree(s) do you hold? From where? Bachelors of Music from Florida International University and Masters in Music Composition from Baylor University
  3. Where were you born? Fort Lauderdale, Florida.
  4. In five words or less, describe what you do at the DPG: Manage Digitization projects and infrastructure.
  5. Coolest/strangest/most unique item you’ve worked with at the DPG: A 1948 aluminum-core radio transcription disc in excellent condition.
  6. Why do you think the work we do is important? Because we share Baylor’s unique materials with the world, provide access for researchers to digitized original source materials, and work to preserve the digital objects in perpetuity.
  7. If you could spend the day with anyone, alive or dead, who would it be and why? Carl Sagan, there are billions and billions of reasons.
  8. Favorite bands: Foo Fighters, Mumford & Sons, Taking Back Sunday
  9. What do you do when you’re not at work? Spend time with wife and three kids doing fun kid stuff.
  10. Your favorite random fact? Hard to say this is my favorite but it is definitely random, Seinfeld (not Friends) became the first television series to get more than a million dollars/minute for advertising.

  1. When did you join the DPG? November 2005
  2. What degree(s) do you hold? From where? BA in Public Relations from Texas Tech University and MA in Museum Studies from Baylor University
  3. Where were you born? Borger, Texas
  4. In five words or less, describe what you do at the DPG: Curate. Research. Outreach. Media. Materials.
  5. Coolest/strangest/most unique item you’ve worked with at the DPG: Digitizing a 13th c. hymnal, hand-illustrated on vellum
  6. Why do you think the work we do is important? I have a full slate of anecdotal stories about why what we do is important, but it boils down to this: We make the previously semi-accessible instantaneous, which leads to new insight, new scholarship, and new understandings.
  7. If you could spend the day with anyone, alive or dead, who would it be and why? Chicago architect – and planner of the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition – Daniel Hudson Burnham. If that answer confuses/intrigues you, please see Erik Larson’s The Devil in the White City. I think you’ll understand why pretty quickly after that.
  8. Favorite bands: The Old 97’s, Foo Fighters, Led Zeppelin
  9. What do you do when you’re not at work? Read, eat, spend time with my wife Amy and 2-year-old daughter Sophia
  10. Your favorite random fact? Lincoln Logs were invented by Frank Lloyd Wright’s son.

  1. When did you join the DPG? October 2010   
  2. What degree(s) do you hold? From where? BA in Film and Digital Media from Baylor
  3. Where were you born? Austin, Tejas
  4. In five words or less, describe what you do at the DPG: Manage project flow and student workers (I know that’s 6 but I’m not counting “and” as a word =))
  5. Coolest/strangest/most unique item you’ve worked with at the DPG? 1920’s Football Playbook
  6. Why do you think the work we do is important? So people can access these items online and find useful information from them without having to handle the actual materials.
  7. If you could spend the day with anyone, alive or dead, who would it be and why? Will Smith because he is just oh so funny.
  8. Favorite band: The Rocket Summer
  9. What do you do when you’re not at work? Shopping; Get all artsy and start making things.
  10. Your favorite random fact? On Friends, the iconic frame on Monica’s door was originally a mirror but a crew member smashed it.

  1. When did you join the DPG? I joined the DPG in late July 2012.
  2. What degree(s) do you hold? From where? I have a Bachelor of Arts in English from Baylor University.
  3. Where were you born? I was born in Tifton, Georgia [aka the Deep South].
  4. In five words or less, describe what you do at the DPG: Manage projects for Texas Collection.
  5. Coolest/strangest/most unique item you’ve worked with at the DPG: I particularly enjoyed getting to see and read some of the letters between Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Browning and gaining unique insight into their romance.
  6. Why do you think the work we do is important? Society continues to advance technologically, and as a result, valuable pieces from our past are often disregarded as having little value or are left to fall apart. The DPG works diligently to make sure that the items entrusted to or relating to Baylor University are well preserved in order to benefit future generations.
  7. If you could spend the day with anyone, alive or dead, who would it be and why? It would have to be C.S. Lewis. Not only was he an incredible author, but he was also one of the wisest and funniest theologians of all time.
  8. Favorite band(s): John Mayer, The Civil Wars, Ben Rector
  9. What do you do when you’re not at work? I love to read, shop, and attempt to tackle cool projects I find on Pinterest
  10. 10. Your favorite random fact? The peach was the first fruit to be eaten on the Moon [since I’m from the “peach state”].

  1. When did you join the DPG? Joined full-time in May 2012; split time between here and Crouch [Fine Arts Library] for a year before that.
  2. What degree(s) do you hold? From where? Bachelor of Music from Baylor and Master of Library Science from UNT
  3. Where were you born? Victoria, TX (grew up in Yoakum, TX)
  4. In five words or less, describe what you do at the DPG: Digitize audio and video materials
  5. Coolest/strangest/most unique item you’ve worked with at the DPG: I digitized a bunch of cassettes of David Koresh’s phone conversations with hostage negotiators.
  6. Why do you think the work we do is important? I think that the materials we work with (most of them at least) are an important part of our cultural heritage, and many of them are in danger of being lost because of degradation or obsolescence. 
  7. If you could spend the day with anyone, alive or dead, who would it be and why? President Obama, because I’m really curious what the average day of a US president is like, and he seems really cool.  I don’t want to play basketball though.
  8. Favorite bands: Radiohead and Pearl Jam
  9. What do you do when you’re not at work? Watch TV, cook, or work on recording and mixing music
  10. Your favorite random fact? I once attended a two-day, hands on, European-style hog butchery class.

***
We hope that gives you a better understanding of the people charged with digitizing and making available the unique resources of Baylor University’s special collections, libraries, and institutes. If you have any questions for us, leave them in the comments, or send us an email at digitalcollectionsinfo@baylor.edu!

Photos from the fine folks at Baylor University Marketing and Communications – Photography.