Got through the Interview—now what?

Business TeamYou’ve spent all this time researching, preparing, and practicing for your interview. It was over in a flash, so what happens now? Commence: The waiting game. This time-frame can feel unsettling and unnerving. Even if you felt confident in your interview performance, the final outcome is unknown. Do you have to spend this waiting period passively sitting by your email account or phone? No, in fact you don’t. Have no fear, for there are couple of ways for you to actively wait by following through in your interview process.

  1. Send a follow-up email: As soon as you get home after your interview, make a point to sit down and write a message to your interviewers. You should have gathered business cards for each person involved in the interview process. This doesn’t have to be a long and drawn out email. If you felt that the company was a strong fit, then express your continued interest in the position. Thank the interviewers for their time and for the opportunity to be considered for the job. This email message only needs to be a few sentences to convey your interest in the role after the in-person meeting, to reiterate your fit for the position, and how they can contact you.
  1. Call your references: If you haven’t already notified your references of your in-person interview opportunity, now is the time! It’s very important for them to know where you interviewed and a bit about the position. Your references may be asked questions about your expertise in certain areas, and the more they are informed of the position, the better they will convey your fit. You can also ask your references to articulate what they plan to say about you, to ensure they portray your background and capability in the best light.
  1. Send a hand-written thank you note: You might think that the email you sent already covered your follow-up, but this is an extra gesture that will leave a lasting impression with the employer. The immediate email will keep you fresh in their mind, while a handwritten thank you note that arrives a few days later will remind them of your performance. You can also keep this note on the shorter end, but try to write something different than in your email message.

The waiting process can feel long, but adding these few active steps can help you stay engaged. Stay positive and good luck out there!

Some references drawn from:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/jennagoudreau/2012/03/08/after-the-job-interview-five-crucial-steps-to-seal-the-deal/#40ff8577feee

Written by: Rachel Kent, Employer Relations Specialist, Baylor University

How to Land Your Dream Job: A Thanksgiving Meal

24304 Betty Crocker's Guide to Your First Thanksgiving

Written by:  Charlie Foster, Employer Relations Specialist at Baylor University

You’re graduating from college in less than a month, and you are interviewing for your dream job after Thanksgiving. But you’re worried that you aren’t bringing all the right tools to the table.

Think of your interview as a traditional Thanksgiving meal. While every part of your interview is important as an individual component, the complete picture that you present is the part that sells the recruiter. In short, it’s the delicious whole that everyone looks forward to. Look at your job seeking and interview as each of the parts of the Thanksgiving meal:

Grandma’s Homemade Dressing – Your Educational Experience

Everyone expects grandma to make her traditional, homemade dressing. It’s the one thing that everyone knows will be there. The same thing is true with your educational experience. Everyone has their own experience, just like grandma has her own recipe. But interviewers expect you to have a college education. Find a way to make yours standout. This may be a particular study abroad or project that you worked on in your major. Utilize that when talking about your educational experience.

Mashed Potatoes and Gravy – Your Internships

Mashed potatoes are the staple side that everyone loves at Thanksgiving. It’s the simple foundation of the meal that goes with everything. Your internships are the foundation of your appeal as a candidate in an interview. The more internships you have, the better you look to a new employer. And everyone loves a solid, learning internship for the foundation of your new career.

Auntie Muriel’s Green Bean Casserole – Your Resume

Auntie Muriel may not be the best cook ever, but she knows how to make your least favorite side a bit more appealing. Your resume makes your learning and experiences more appealing, too. While it might be a simple piece of paper that you love to dread, it is important for you to have with every application and interview. You need to make sure that your resume is professional, well organized, and easy-to-read for all interviewers and recruiters. Make sure to utilize your resources to have your resume proofread and designed for better appeal.

The Thanksgiving Turkey – Your In-Person Interview

The star of the show is the Thanksgiving turkey. Your interview is in the limelight for you to get this job. While the turkey takes time to be seasoned and prepped for cooking, you also need to prepare for your interview well in advance. Learn about the company that you are interviewing with, including their culture and main responsibilities. You should also know as much as you can about the job that you are interviewing with. With this knowledge, you will be able to brightly shine, just like the turkey at dinner time.

Pumpkin Pie – Your Personality, and You

The grand finale of the meal: the pumpkin pie. It’s the part of the meal that everything builds up to, and the part that leaves the best impression. Your personality and the way you present yourself is the most impactful impression during the interview. As cliché as it sounds, the most important thing you can do is be yourself. Recruiters and interviewers can tell when you are being fake, are nervous, or not confident in yourself. The best thing to do is to present yourself with confidence and determination that you are the right candidate for the job.

By bringing the complete meal to the table, you are sure to land your dream job!

 

 

8 Common Résumé Questions

typewriterCareer and Professional Development offers résumé review drop-in hours every day. Here is a list of the most common questions I get asked:

  1. How small can I make my font size or margins?

Margins can be anywhere from .5 to 1 inch; use your best judgment and keep it easy-to-scan. Font size should be 10 point or larger to keep your résumé from being too crowded or difficult to read.

  1. Can I put high school experiences on my résumé?

It depends on how old you are and how much university experience you have to discuss. As a freshman or sophomore, you may have some high school experience on your resume until you become more involved on campus or attain a part-time job/summer internship.

  1. How can I make one résumé for all my applications?

It is not best practice to use one generic résumé because each job position or graduate program has different requirements or preferences. Every résumé you create should be tailored to display the skills and experiences desired for each application. You may want to create one “master résumé” that lists all your accomplishments and experiences and then choose which items are most relevant for each job or graduate opportunity you pursue.

  1. My résumé is a page and a half, is that okay?

If you are an undergraduate student, your résumé should really be one page. Graduate schools may require a Curriculum Vitae (CV) or longer résumé, but if it is not specified, try to keep it to one page. There are some exceptions. If you are unsure, ask a career advisor.

  1. Should I include my work experience from part-time jobs in restaurants or clothing stores?

Absolutely! Show off your relevant and transferable skills (customer service, communication, etc.) from all your work experiences! However, you may not include them if you have more relevant experiences you want to discuss or run out of space on your one-page résumé.

  1. Do I have to include a profile or objective statement?

No, these are optional résumé components. It may be helpful to have a profile if you are applying to a job that does not necessarily align with your major or past experiences because it gives recruiters a better idea of who you are and why you are applying. Objective statements can be helpful for career fairs where recruiters are hiring for multiple jobs and you want to clarify which position you are seeking.

  1. Should I put Microsoft Office skills on my résumé?

There is no need to list Office unless the job posting specifically mentions these skills or you have completed a certification or specialized training. Most companies will assume that you know how to use those programs.

  1. Is it okay to list out my skills (team-player, effective communicator, etc.)?

The best strategy for a skills section is to demonstrate skills with concrete examples rather than simply listing them. To see an example of how to do this effectively, come by our office and pick up a CPD Guide!

Written by Kristin Koch, Graduate Apprentice for Career and Professional Development

WANT TO BUILD A PROFESSIONAL ONLINE PRESENCE? JOIN LINKEDIN!

linkedin

As a former recruiter who worked with employers around the country to fill a range of positions from entry-level college grads to CFOs, I highly recommend that you build a profile on LinkedIn. Any time I reviewed résumés, the first thing I did when I wanted to learn more about someone was go to LinkedIn and see if they had a profile. If they didn’t have a strong profile, I moved their résumé to the bottom of my pile!

Here are six helpful LinkedIn tips to make your profile as effective as possible.

  1. Add a professional picture on your profile – If you post a picture to your profile, studies have shown it is eleven times more likely to be viewed! In my experience as a recruiter, I didn’t even click on profiles that didn’t have pictures. Keep in mind though that your picture needs to be professional. Make sure you are professionally dressed with a nice backdrop behind you, and make sure the picture is only from your upper chest or shoulders and above.
  2. List as many skills as possible on your profile – These skills can be anything from technical skills (such as Excel, PowerPoint, or SAS) to general skills (such as problem solving, public speaking, or sales). People who list skills on their profiles are thirteen times more likely to have their profiles viewed!
  3. Complete the education portion – If you know your expected graduation date, add it to your profile so recruiters don’t contact you about jobs that start before you graduate. Also, be sure to add relevant coursework, and site examples of leadership even if you have to go back to high school activities. Recruiters love leaders!
  4. Connect with alumni – Under the “My Network” column on your homepage, click “Find Alumni”. This is an easy way to find people who would be open to connecting with you. There are nearly 70,000 Baylor alums as of today that you can connect with!
  5. Customize your connection requests – When you request to connect with someone, alter the default message to tell the person how you know them or why you would like to connect. This 10-second task increases the odds that someone you don’t know will agree to connect with you.
  6. Check out the jobs! – LinkedIn has thousands of jobs for professionals at all career stages. You can customize your job search by criteria such as location, company size, industry, experience level, and more. Many times a job posting will even tell you who posted the position, which means you can request to connect with them, introduce yourself, and get your name moved to the top of the job poster’s mind as they are reviewing applicants.

Written By: Adam Kaye, Director of Employer Relations at Baylor University

8 Major Links

Today we will explore a list of links available on the Career and Professional Development website for exploring your major, so grab a cup of coffee and join me on the tour!

1.  Health-Related Programs at Baylor

Our first stop is a list of all the majors and prehealth programs Baylor has to offer.  One really nice feature of this list is that each program is linked to the departmental website where you are sure to find even more information about the particular area, especially the list of courses you would need to take.

2.  Majors and Minors at Baylor

The College of Arts and Sciences has done a tremendous job, taking each of their majors and giving a description, course examples, and potential job opportunities.

This link provides a list of all the major and minor options available at Baylor. It provides a description of the program, course examples, and potential job opportunities..  Since not all majors are minors and not all minors are majors, this resource can be a valuable way to gain a clear understanding of the minors offered.

3.  The Princeton Review’s Major Descriptions

The Princeton Review offers an alphabetical search of a wide variety of majors, listing descriptions of each.  If you want to get another perspective of what is involved in a particular major, this resource might be what you are looking for.

4.  What Can I Do With This Major?

Career Services has put together a generous list of resources that address this very question.  Search the list for majors of interest to you and click the link below the heading to view a PDF with valuable information about different possible areas to pursue with the major, employers for that major, and also strategies for pursuing a career in that field.  I find the PDFs to be full of practical information.  The site is also filled with valuable resources ranging from links to professional associations related to the major field to actual job listings in the area, so you can see exactly what employers are looking for in the hiring process.

5.  What Can I Do With a Major In…?

For this link, we go to the University of North Carolina at Wilmington.  They provide a rich list of majors their school provides, linking each to a list of information and valuable resources that students with interest in that field may find useful.  One of my favorite pieces of information they provide is a list of careers that may be pursued with that major.  This list is very detailed, so you may find other careers related to your major field that you might not have thought of yet.

6.  Major Weblinks

Northern Illinois University has also put together a list of majors linked to valuable information for each.  This website is another great resource to peruse to discover more information regarding majors you are interested in.

7.  What can I do with my liberal arts degree?

If you have been asking yourself this question, then this link might be just right for you.  A click on this link will take you to an article from the Occupation Outlook Quarterly that specifically explores this topic.

8.  Baylor’s Pre-Law Program

While not a major itself, Baylor’s Pre-Law program is a valuable pre-professional program that will help you prepare well for a future in law school and beyond.  This link takes you to Baylor’s Pre-Law website, which is chock full of key information necessary for pursuing the field of law, from pre-law contacts in different university departments to a timeline that will help you stay on track as you pursue your goals.

I hope these resources are helpful as you explore majors of interest to you.  Enjoy your weekend and Sic ‘Em, Bears!!!

 

By:  Amy Ames

Looking for an International Job or Internship Opportunity?

1

Ever thought about working overseas after college? Are you planning to study abroad during your time at Baylor? Are you at Baylor on a student visa, and interested in working in the United States after graduation? If you answered “yes!” to any of these questions, then GoinGlobal is a great resource for you to learn about career opportunities and apply for jobs.

CPD is hosting a GoinGlobal training workshop for students this Thursday at 2:50. Come learn how this premium resource can help you plan for your international experience!

You can use the Country Career Guides in GoinGlobal to research career related information tailored for your country of interest. Each Country Guide covers the following topics:

  • Job Search Resources
  • Non-Profits and Volunteer Organizations
  • Industry and Employment Trends
  • Top Companies
  • Professional and Social Networking
  • Embassy Listings
  • Financial Considerations
  • Work Permits and Visas
  • Résumé/CV Guidelines
  • Interviewing Advice
  • Cultural Advice

Each Country Guide also has links to job sites where you can search for current job postings available in that country in English or in the native language. There are over 16 million jobs posted on GoinGlobal, which are updated daily.

By: Nick Haynes

Careers in Music

Sheet Music

Music can inspire emotions, dreams, and actions.  Many students find so much meaning in music that they want involvement in music to be their life’s work.  Classical musicians usually train from childhood, then go on to major in music at a university or study at a conservatory.  What about the rest of the musicians and music fans out there?

The Berklee College of Music has put together an extensive list of various roles within the music industry.  You can learn more about the occupations of musicians and singers, as well as many related occupations, by visiting the Occupational Outlook Handbook.  The University of North Carolina-Wilmington and Northern Illinois University have compiled list of links pertinent to students with interests in careers in music.

Students are required to audition in order to major in music at Baylor.  However, an audition is not required to minor in music or church music.  Non-majors may also participate in bands, orchestras, and choirs, as well as registering for music classes as a non-major.  For more information on programs through the School of Music at Baylor, visit their website.

Written By: Amy Ames

How to Sell Yourself at a Career Fair

fair

It’s career fair season! And a career fair is a great place to gather information about potential employers and make contacts that can lead to your first job. Here’s some advice on how to make the most of your time at the upcoming events.

STEM Job Fair

Wed., September 14, 2016, 12:00-4:00 pm

5 Things to Take to the Career Fair

  1. Information about the organizations attending. Gather information as you would for a job interview on organizations you’re interested in talking to. To maximize the brief time you have with each employer, you need to know how your skills and interests match their needs. And don’t just concentrate on the “big names.” There are often great opportunities with smaller companies or those with which you are not familiar.
  2. A 30-second “sales pitch.” Share basic information about yourself and your career interests like this: “Hello, I’m Carrie Jones. I’m a senior here at Wonderful University and I’m majoring in English. I’m very interested in a marketing career. As you can see on my resume, I just completed an internship in the Marketing Division of the ABC Company in Peoria. I’ve taken some courses in business marketing. I’m very interested in talking with you about marketing opportunities with your organization.”
  3. Copies of your resume (10 to 15, depending on the size of the event). Be sure it represents your knowledge, skills, and abilities effectively. It needs to look professional—easy to read format on plain white or cream colored paper—and be free of typos. If you are looking at several career options, you may want to have two or more targeted resumes with different career objectives!
  4. A smile, a strong handshake, and a positive attitude. First impressions are important. Approach an employer, smile, and offer your hand when you introduce yourself.
  5. Energy! Career fairs require you to be on your feet moving from table to table for an hour or so. Each time you meet someone, be at your best!

5 Things Not to Do at the Career Fair

  1. Don’t “wing it” with employers. Do your homework! Research the companies just as you would for an interview. Focus on why you want to work for the organization and what you can do for them.
  2. Don’t cruise the booths with a group of friends. Interact with the recruiters on your own. Make your own positive impression!
  3. Don’t carry your backpack, large purse, or other paraphernalia with you. Carry your resume in a professional-looking portfolio or a small briefcase. It will keep your resume neat and handy, and gives you a place to file business cards of recruiters that you meet. Stow your coat, backpack, or other gear in a coatroom.
  4. Don’t come dressed casually. A career fair is a professional activity—perhaps your first contact with a future employer.
  5. Don’t come during the last half hour of the event. Many employers come a long distance to attend the fair and may need to leave early. If you come late, you may miss the organizations you wanted to contact!

5 Things to Take Home From the Career Fair

  1. Business cards from the recruiters you have met. Use the cards to write follow-up notes to those organizations in which you are most interested.
  2. Notes about contacts you made. Write down important details about particular organizations, including names of people who may not have had business cards. Take a few minutes after you leave each table to jot down these notes!
  3. Information about organizations you have contacted. Most recruiters will have information for you to pick up, including company brochures, computer diskettes or CD’s, position descriptions, and other data. You won’t have time to deal with these at the fair!
  4. A better sense of your career options. If you have used the event correctly, you will have made contact with several organizations that hire people with your skills and interests. In thinking about their needs and your background, evaluate whether each company might be a match for you.
  5. Self-confidence in interacting with employer representatives. A career fair gives you the opportunity to practice your interview skills in a less formidable environment than a formal interview. Use this experience to practice talking about what you have done, what you know, and what your interests are.

Courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

5 Fun Facts about the On-Campus Internship Program

OCIP flyer HighRez

1.       An internship with the On-Campus Internship Program is a university recognized work experience focused on project-based work directly related to the student’s major or field of interest.

2.       The On-Campus Internship Program partners with 35 on-campus departments to offer more than 60 internship positions. There are over 40 positions currently available for application.

3.       Departments hosting on-campus interns are providing experiential learning opportunities for over a dozen majors. These include marketing, design, engineering, nutrition, and finance, to name a few.

4.       All On-Campus Internship Program positions are paid. The program is a student employment opportunity that allows students to earn any available work-study dollars.

5.       The On-Campus Internship Program provides professional development trainings and support to prepare students for graduate school or the workforce.

The On-Campus Internship Program is accepting applications NOW through September 6th. Check out all of the available positions using the link below and apply today!

On-Campus Internship Positions

Contact Chelsea_Waldrop@baylor.edu with questions!

 

2 Great Websites for Grad School Planning

This time of year, more and more students are starting to ask questions about grad school. How do I find an accredited program?…What are the admission requirements?…and finally…Is this going to cost an arm and a leg? There’s good news for those of you asking the same questions! I have recently stumbled upon 2 great resources for helping you get started…and it’s not as scary as you think!

  1. Kaplan’s 20-Minute Workout 

    Kaplan offers a FREE 20 Minute Workout practice exam with realistic questions. After you complete the exercise, you’ll see a breakdown of how well you did complete with answers and explanations. Click on the appropriate exam below to get started.

  2.  Affordable Colleges Online (ACU)

    This website is eye-popping and extremely user-friendly…2 of my favorite things! ACU offers a comprehensive look into grad schools by allowing you to search programs by subject, location, and degree type. It also provides information on rankings, accreditation, tuition, and financial aid. There’s even a search tool for individuals looking for online-only programs and online Christian colleges. Other resources include comprehensive guidebooks, student interviews, federal datasets and other materials created and vetted by experts in their fields.

 

Related posts:

Best Websites for Graduate and Professional School Planning

Is Grad School Right for Me and How Do I Choose a Program?

Post-Baccalaureate Pre-medical Programs