8 Major Links

Today we will explore a list of links available on the Career and Professional Development website for exploring your major, so grab a cup of coffee and join me on the tour!

1.  Health-Related Programs at Baylor

Our first stop is a list of all the majors and prehealth programs Baylor has to offer.  One really nice feature of this list is that each program is linked to the departmental website where you are sure to find even more information about the particular area, especially the list of courses you would need to take.

2.  Majors and Minors at Baylor

The College of Arts and Sciences has done a tremendous job, taking each of their majors and giving a description, course examples, and potential job opportunities.

This link provides a list of all the major and minor options available at Baylor. It provides a description of the program, course examples, and potential job opportunities..  Since not all majors are minors and not all minors are majors, this resource can be a valuable way to gain a clear understanding of the minors offered.

3.  The Princeton Review’s Major Descriptions

The Princeton Review offers an alphabetical search of a wide variety of majors, listing descriptions of each.  If you want to get another perspective of what is involved in a particular major, this resource might be what you are looking for.

4.  What Can I Do With This Major?

Career Services has put together a generous list of resources that address this very question.  Search the list for majors of interest to you and click the link below the heading to view a PDF with valuable information about different possible areas to pursue with the major, employers for that major, and also strategies for pursuing a career in that field.  I find the PDFs to be full of practical information.  The site is also filled with valuable resources ranging from links to professional associations related to the major field to actual job listings in the area, so you can see exactly what employers are looking for in the hiring process.

5.  What Can I Do With a Major In…?

For this link, we go to the University of North Carolina at Wilmington.  They provide a rich list of majors their school provides, linking each to a list of information and valuable resources that students with interest in that field may find useful.  One of my favorite pieces of information they provide is a list of careers that may be pursued with that major.  This list is very detailed, so you may find other careers related to your major field that you might not have thought of yet.

6.  Major Weblinks

Northern Illinois University has also put together a list of majors linked to valuable information for each.  This website is another great resource to peruse to discover more information regarding majors you are interested in.

7.  What can I do with my liberal arts degree?

If you have been asking yourself this question, then this link might be just right for you.  A click on this link will take you to an article from the Occupation Outlook Quarterly that specifically explores this topic.

8.  Baylor’s Pre-Law Program

While not a major itself, Baylor’s Pre-Law program is a valuable pre-professional program that will help you prepare well for a future in law school and beyond.  This link takes you to Baylor’s Pre-Law website, which is chock full of key information necessary for pursuing the field of law, from pre-law contacts in different university departments to a timeline that will help you stay on track as you pursue your goals.

I hope these resources are helpful as you explore majors of interest to you.  Enjoy your weekend and Sic ‘Em, Bears!!!


By:  Amy Ames

Looking for an International Job or Internship Opportunity?


Ever thought about working overseas after college? Are you planning to study abroad during your time at Baylor? Are you at Baylor on a student visa, and interested in working in the United States after graduation? If you answered “yes!” to any of these questions, then GoinGlobal is a great resource for you to learn about career opportunities and apply for jobs.

CPD is hosting a GoinGlobal training workshop for students this Thursday at 2:50. Come learn how this premium resource can help you plan for your international experience!

You can use the Country Career Guides in GoinGlobal to research career related information tailored for your country of interest. Each Country Guide covers the following topics:

  • Job Search Resources
  • Non-Profits and Volunteer Organizations
  • Industry and Employment Trends
  • Top Companies
  • Professional and Social Networking
  • Embassy Listings
  • Financial Considerations
  • Work Permits and Visas
  • Résumé/CV Guidelines
  • Interviewing Advice
  • Cultural Advice

Each Country Guide also has links to job sites where you can search for current job postings available in that country in English or in the native language. There are over 16 million jobs posted on GoinGlobal, which are updated daily.

By: Nick Haynes

Careers in Music

Sheet Music

Music can inspire emotions, dreams, and actions.  Many students find so much meaning in music that they want involvement in music to be their life’s work.  Classical musicians usually train from childhood, then go on to major in music at a university or study at a conservatory.  What about the rest of the musicians and music fans out there?

The Berklee College of Music has put together an extensive list of various roles within the music industry.  You can learn more about the occupations of musicians and singers, as well as many related occupations, by visiting the Occupational Outlook Handbook.  The University of North Carolina-Wilmington and Northern Illinois University have compiled list of links pertinent to students with interests in careers in music.

Students are required to audition in order to major in music at Baylor.  However, an audition is not required to minor in music or church music.  Non-majors may also participate in bands, orchestras, and choirs, as well as registering for music classes as a non-major.  For more information on programs through the School of Music at Baylor, visit their website.

Written By: Amy Ames

How to Sell Yourself at a Career Fair


It’s career fair season! And a career fair is a great place to gather information about potential employers and make contacts that can lead to your first job. Here’s some advice on how to make the most of your time at the upcoming events.

STEM Job Fair

Wed., September 14, 2016, 12:00-4:00 pm

5 Things to Take to the Career Fair

  1. Information about the organizations attending. Gather information as you would for a job interview on organizations you’re interested in talking to. To maximize the brief time you have with each employer, you need to know how your skills and interests match their needs. And don’t just concentrate on the “big names.” There are often great opportunities with smaller companies or those with which you are not familiar.
  2. A 30-second “sales pitch.” Share basic information about yourself and your career interests like this: “Hello, I’m Carrie Jones. I’m a senior here at Wonderful University and I’m majoring in English. I’m very interested in a marketing career. As you can see on my resume, I just completed an internship in the Marketing Division of the ABC Company in Peoria. I’ve taken some courses in business marketing. I’m very interested in talking with you about marketing opportunities with your organization.”
  3. Copies of your resume (10 to 15, depending on the size of the event). Be sure it represents your knowledge, skills, and abilities effectively. It needs to look professional—easy to read format on plain white or cream colored paper—and be free of typos. If you are looking at several career options, you may want to have two or more targeted resumes with different career objectives!
  4. A smile, a strong handshake, and a positive attitude. First impressions are important. Approach an employer, smile, and offer your hand when you introduce yourself.
  5. Energy! Career fairs require you to be on your feet moving from table to table for an hour or so. Each time you meet someone, be at your best!

5 Things Not to Do at the Career Fair

  1. Don’t “wing it” with employers. Do your homework! Research the companies just as you would for an interview. Focus on why you want to work for the organization and what you can do for them.
  2. Don’t cruise the booths with a group of friends. Interact with the recruiters on your own. Make your own positive impression!
  3. Don’t carry your backpack, large purse, or other paraphernalia with you. Carry your resume in a professional-looking portfolio or a small briefcase. It will keep your resume neat and handy, and gives you a place to file business cards of recruiters that you meet. Stow your coat, backpack, or other gear in a coatroom.
  4. Don’t come dressed casually. A career fair is a professional activity—perhaps your first contact with a future employer.
  5. Don’t come during the last half hour of the event. Many employers come a long distance to attend the fair and may need to leave early. If you come late, you may miss the organizations you wanted to contact!

5 Things to Take Home From the Career Fair

  1. Business cards from the recruiters you have met. Use the cards to write follow-up notes to those organizations in which you are most interested.
  2. Notes about contacts you made. Write down important details about particular organizations, including names of people who may not have had business cards. Take a few minutes after you leave each table to jot down these notes!
  3. Information about organizations you have contacted. Most recruiters will have information for you to pick up, including company brochures, computer diskettes or CD’s, position descriptions, and other data. You won’t have time to deal with these at the fair!
  4. A better sense of your career options. If you have used the event correctly, you will have made contact with several organizations that hire people with your skills and interests. In thinking about their needs and your background, evaluate whether each company might be a match for you.
  5. Self-confidence in interacting with employer representatives. A career fair gives you the opportunity to practice your interview skills in a less formidable environment than a formal interview. Use this experience to practice talking about what you have done, what you know, and what your interests are.

Courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

5 Fun Facts about the On-Campus Internship Program

OCIP flyer HighRez

1.       An internship with the On-Campus Internship Program is a university recognized work experience focused on project-based work directly related to the student’s major or field of interest.

2.       The On-Campus Internship Program partners with 35 on-campus departments to offer more than 60 internship positions. There are over 40 positions currently available for application.

3.       Departments hosting on-campus interns are providing experiential learning opportunities for over a dozen majors. These include marketing, design, engineering, nutrition, and finance, to name a few.

4.       All On-Campus Internship Program positions are paid. The program is a student employment opportunity that allows students to earn any available work-study dollars.

5.       The On-Campus Internship Program provides professional development trainings and support to prepare students for graduate school or the workforce.

The On-Campus Internship Program is accepting applications NOW through September 6th. Check out all of the available positions using the link below and apply today!

On-Campus Internship Positions

Contact Chelsea_Waldrop@baylor.edu with questions!


2 Great Websites for Grad School Planning

This time of year, more and more students are starting to ask questions about grad school. How do I find an accredited program?…What are the admission requirements?…and finally…Is this going to cost an arm and a leg? There’s good news for those of you asking the same questions! I have recently stumbled upon 2 great resources for helping you get started…and it’s not as scary as you think!

  1. Kaplan’s 20-Minute Workout 

    Kaplan offers a FREE 20 Minute Workout practice exam with realistic questions. After you complete the exercise, you’ll see a breakdown of how well you did complete with answers and explanations. Click on the appropriate exam below to get started.

  2.  Affordable Colleges Online (ACU)

    This website is eye-popping and extremely user-friendly…2 of my favorite things! ACU offers a comprehensive look into grad schools by allowing you to search programs by subject, location, and degree type. It also provides information on rankings, accreditation, tuition, and financial aid. There’s even a search tool for individuals looking for online-only programs and online Christian colleges. Other resources include comprehensive guidebooks, student interviews, federal datasets and other materials created and vetted by experts in their fields.


Related posts:

Best Websites for Graduate and Professional School Planning

Is Grad School Right for Me and How Do I Choose a Program?

Post-Baccalaureate Pre-medical Programs


Network For Your Job Search

networkNetworking could be what helps you land a job.

If you take part in social networking sites, you probably have a pretty good idea of how networking can enhance your personal life. But, if you’re like many new college graduates, you’re probably not as comfortable about incorporating networking into your job search.

In spite of your discomfort, you need to incorporate networking into your job search: Especially in a competitive job market, networking could be what helps you land a job. In fact, many jobs are filled before they are even advertised—filled by people who learned about the opportunity before it was formally announced.

What is networking when it comes to the job search? It’s not about using people. Just as you look to build personal relationships through social networks, you want to build relationships to foster your professional life. These relationships can help you not only in your current job search but down the road as you build your career.

Networking is not one-sided: It works both ways. You offer assistance to others just as they offer assistance to you. Perhaps the easiest way to think about networking is to see it as an extension of being friendly, outgoing, and active.

Here are some tips for building and maintaining a healthy network:

  1. Make a list of everyone you know—and people they know—and identify how they could help you gather career information or experience.
    Who do you know at school? Professors, friends, and even friends’ parents can all be helpful contacts. Did you hold a part-time job? Volunteer? Serve an internship? Think about the people you came into contact with there.
  2. Sign up for an alumni mentoring program.
    Many colleges offer such programs, and they are a great way to build relationships in your field.
  3. Join the campus chapter of a professional society that relates to your career choice.
    In many ways, a professional society is an instant network: You’ll be with others who have the same general career interest. Plus, you may be able to learn more about your field from them. For example, you may be able to learn about the field and potential employers from others who share their internship experiences.
  4. Volunteer at a local museum, theater, homeless shelter—anywhere that even remotely relates to your field of study.
    By volunteering, you’ll not only learn about your chosen field firsthand, you’ll also be able to connect with people who are in the field.
  5. Speak to company representatives at career fairs, even if you’re not ready to look for a job.
    Be up front that you’re not currently in the job market and don’t take a lot of the representative’s time, but touching base with a potential employer now can help you down the road when you are ready.
  6. Attend company information sessions at your college and talk one-on-one to the recruiters who run them.
  7. Schedule informational interviews with people who can tell you about their careers.
    It’s best to ask to meet in person or by phone for a short interview, and don’t immediately start asking “How can you help me?” Plan your questions ahead of time, focusing on how the company works and how the person shaped his or her career path.
  8. Add your profile to LinkedIn.
    It’s free. And then, work your profile. Add work history (including internships!), skills, and keywords. Make connections to people you’ve worked with or met through networking. Ask for “recommendations” from people who have worked with you. You’ll find LinkedIn is a good source of suggestions for people in your field to contact for informational interviews.
  9. Remember to be courteous and tactful in all your conversations, to send thank-you notes to people who help you, and to find ways to help others as well.
    Don’t drop your network once you’ve gotten a job. Nurture the relationships you’ve built and look for opportunities to build new connections throughout your career. Getting started might be uncomfortable, but with time and practice, networking will be second nature.


Courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

Don’t Overlook Public Service Job Opportunities


If you’re a college student exploring careers, you may not be aware of the wide range of job opportunities in public service. Careers in the federal government range from scientist to engineer to museum curator. Federal architects plan embassies around the world. Urban park rangers teach history to visitors. Biologists study sharks, sea turtles, and dolphins. Engineers develop robots for the space shuttle. Students in science, technology, engineering, math, and medical fields (STEMM) find occupations in plant pathology, fire protection engineering, naval architecture, astronomy, space science, and cryptanalysis.

As the nation’s largest employer with about 2 million civilian workers, the government is seeking to fill thousands of positions at any given time, and these federal jobs match almost every set of skills and interests. In the last fiscal year, the government hired nearly 92,000 full-time permanent employees, and these jobs were located in all 50 states and overseas, not just in Washington, D.C.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture employs more than 1,000 civil engineers. More than 3,500 people at the Social Security Administration work in information technology management. If your interests are heavy on science, look for jobs at the National Institutes of Health or the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Physics and engineering? Think about opportunities at the U.S. Department of Energy and the 10 NASA centers around the country.

What’s Real About Federal Employment

It is a myth that the government isn’t hiring. More than 76,800 federal workers were hired in 2013 and nearly 92,000 became new federal employees in 2014.

Another myth is that federal pay and benefits can’t compete with other sectors. In fact, both pay and benefits are competitive. Total pay also can vary depending on where the job is located. In more expensive geographic areas, the addition of locality pay bumps up salaries to ensure the same standard of living for employees, regardless of their location.

Salary is not the only consideration when comparing job opportunities. Federal employees get other benefits including student loan repayment assistance; flexible schedules, and vacation and sick leave packages; health and retirement benefits; training and other professional development activities; and advancement opportunities.

Take Advantage of the Opportunities

As a student or recent graduate, you are eligible for the Pathways Programs that give students from qualifying educational institutions and programs, and recent graduates, a chance to explore different career paths, gain experience, and decide if an agency is right for them.

If you are a current student, you are eligible for internships, and if you are a recent graduate, you can work in government for one year—with both opportunities potentially leading to full-time employment. For either of these, you undertake a program of 40 hours of training and development, possibly including mentorship.

The government’s most prestigious fellowship is the two-year-long Presidential Management Fellows (PMF) Program, open to individuals with qualifying advanced degrees. In this program, you receive 80 hours of training and development, complete an individual development plan, and are assigned a senior-level mentor. You also spend a portion of your time in a rotational or development assignment, to experience opportunities in your discipline in another department or agency.

Where to Apply

The federal government has dozens of departments and agencies. To narrow your focus, it helps to concentrate on agencies that make the most sense for your interests, whether it is federal housing, public health, or international issues.

You can search for those agencies on several websites:

1.     USAJOBS.gov—The federal government’s jobs portal.

2.     USA.gov—A government website that provides an “A-Z index” of federal agencies.

3.     FEB.gov—A forum for communication and collaboration among federal agencies outside of Washington that you can use to find federal points of contact in your area.

4.     Fedscope.opm.gov—An Office of Personal Management website containing federal human resources data.

5.     Bestplacestowork.org—The Partnership’s site ranking where federal agencies stand based on employee satisfaction surveys.

6.     Social Media—Many agencies are on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and other sites.

How to Apply for Federal Job Opportunities

The government’s jobs website, USAJOBS.gov, has resources explaining how to apply for jobs. The Partnership’s Go Government website also offers a wealth of information on applying. On GoGovernment.org, you will find a step-by-step guide on the application process, along with profiles of young federal employees, and occupation guides that describe the people and positions that specific agencies are hiring.

If you are unsure about which federal agency you’re interested in, the Partnership produces the annual Best Places to Work in the Federal Government® rankings that offer information on which agencies house the highest percentages of satisfied employees. Another good place to start is at federal agency websites, where you’ll find information about the mission and the work, and get a flavor for an agency’s culture.

By:  Caleb Campbell

Caleb Campbell is an associate manager on the Education and Outreach team at the Partnership for Public Service. In his role, Campbell manages the Call to Serve network providing resources and information to more than 1,000 colleges and universities on federal hiring and the best strategies for getting the top talent into government.

Courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

Good Questions to Ask at the Interview


blank notebook
You’ve probably heard it a million times: A job interview should be a two-way conversation. You may assume that means someone asks questions and you offer answers. But that’s only half of the conversation. Interviewers expect you to ask questions, too—and asking thoughtful questions can polish your image as a job seeker.

Asking questions is one way to show that you are interested in the job. It shows you’ve researched the organization and you’ve heard what the interviewer has told you about the job. Your questions also will help you see how the job and the organization fit into your career goals.

When preparing questions before the interview, your first stop should be the organization’s website—don’t want to ask questions that are already covered online. Next, pay close attention to details that come to light during the interview—you’ll want to include questions on information you hear.

Here are examples of questions you can ask (and why you should ask them):

What does a typical work day look like? What is a typical week like in this job?

(You’re showing interest in life on the job in the organization.)

With whom would I be working? Who would be my supervisor?

(You’re looking seriously at your potential place in the organization.)

What are the challenges facing the person in this position? What are your expectations for this role?

(You’re asking about your fit within the company and your future with the organization.)

Why did you choose to work for this company?

(Ask this question of anyone you meet during your interview. It gives the interviewer a chance to “sell” the company and gives you insight into what others think about working for the organization.)

How would you describe your company culture?

(Are you and the company are well matched? Is this the environment you want to join?)

What is the natural career progression for employees with my skill set?

(You’re demonstrating that you’re thinking about a long-term future with the company.)

Does this organization have a formal mentor or coaching program? How is it structured?

(This illustrates that you are interested in being a good employee and improving on the job.)

What kind of internal and external training do you provide?

(This question illustrates your desire to excel in the job.)

After you’ve asked your questions, restate your interest in the organization.

Then, ask for the job—this reiterates your interest in joining the organization.

Finally, ask these few last questions:

  • What is the next step in the hiring process?
  • When will you make your decision?
  • May I call you?
  • When is a good time?


Courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

7 Popular Careers for an ISFP: A look into the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator

sunflower saying

ISFP’s have a strong aesthetic awareness and tend to seek out beauty in their surroundings. They enjoy hands-on activities and being able see tangible results from their work.

Most ISFP’s are extremely loyal and observant to the needs of others, although they may be harder to get to know at first. They are quiet and reserved, but have a special ability to pick up on the emotions of other people and enjoy being able to provide practical help.

ISFP’s are rarely assertive and tend to shy away from positions of authority, preferring to take more of a supporting role.  They appreciate clear expectations, set deadlines, and a degree of autonomy at work. ISFP’s live in the present and thrive in a flexible and supportive environment.

Here are 7 popular careers for an ISFP:


Not sure what your personality type is? Schedule a Career Exploration appointment with a Career Advisor to learn more about your personality and interests, and how those translate into career paths.