How to Use This Blog in Career Planning

Photo by ebayink via Flickr

Photo by ebayink via Flickr

Are you a passive or active reader of this blog?  Of course, we sincerely appreciate our passive readers who eagerly anticipate the biweekly arrival of our posts in your inbox.  However, there are some ways to really make this blog work for you.  Here are three ideas for becoming an active reader and getting more out of your experience with us.

First, note the search box in the right-hand column.  Doing a keyword search for your major or a career that interests you could help you uncover posts with exactly the information that you need.  Second, you can use our category tags (also in the right-hand column) to quickly pull information on a career topic that you are researching.  Third, you can interact with us by commenting on posts or contacting us to suggest a topic for future posts.  We want this blog to be helpful to you, so let us know how we can best accomplish that.

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Bruiser uses CPD!

bruiser

With the vast array of services that Career and Professional Development has to offer, it’s no wonder that even Bruiser uses CPD. Check out this video of Bruiser taking advantage of what we have to offer and learn more about ways we can help you too!

 

 

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International Career Opportunities

Mission2

Today, I want to bring your attention to one of the premium resources offered to you by Baylor Career and Professional Development.  The resource is called Goinglobal, and it offers information to students who are interested in international employment, internships, and volunteer opportunities.  Additionally, the site details cultural advice, work permit/visa information, and resume/interviewing tips for individual countries.

We also encourage you to check out our other premium resources, which you can view by clicking here.

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Use Your Common Sense Day

Students4

In honor of Use Your Common Sense Day, I thought I would take a few moments to discuss how common sense plays a critical role in career decision-making.  First, consider your academic performance in your major.  Are you making an A in most of your classes?  If not, what could you do to improve your performance?  If you spend an adequate amount of time studying and take advantage of academic support resources, yet you still aren’t making the grade, perhaps a change of major would yield better results.  A strong grade point average is important for keeping graduate/professional school and employment options open.

Next, consider if you are truly enjoying your major classes.  If not, what is your rationale for being in your major?  If you do not enjoy your major, there is a risk that you will not like your career, either.  People who enjoy their work often demonstrate more motivation and initiative.  Consequently, they may experience more success than their colleagues who do not enjoy their work.

Finally, do you have work experience related to your career goal?  If not, you might experience difficulty in your job search or graduate school application process.  Depending on your area of interest, internships, part-time employment, summer jobs, volunteer opportunities, and shadowing could be methods for opening up more opportunities in your future.

The staff of Career and Professional Development are happy to help you explore your options and find relevant experience.  Review the information on our website to determine which of our services could be most useful to you.

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CPD Ambassador Program

 

Are you interested in getting more involved with The Office of Career and Professional Development and developing valuable skills?  Check out this new opportunity!CPD Ambassador Program

The Office of Career & Professional Development (CPD) is seeking applications from students to serve as ambassadors for the 2014-2015 academic year.  Current students who are in good academic standing and enrolled at Baylor through May 2016 are encouraged to apply.  To apply, submit your résumé and cover letter of interest, including your responses, by 12 p.m. noon on Wednesday, November 12, 2014 to Michelle_Cohenour@baylor.edu.

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Online Resources from Career and Professional Development

Keyboard

Though the staff of Career and Professional Development are eager to help you with career exploration and planning, what happens if you have a question outside of our 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. office hours?  Fear not!  We have a bevy of online resources to help you.  When you have a chance, familiarize yourself with the Career and Professional Development website.

Here are a few highlights:

  • Focus 2 Online Assessment for students who are unsure about majors and career possibilities
  • Career Exploration Resources for researching job descriptions, qualifications, salaries, and job growth projections
  • Career Guides to aid in writing resumes and cover letters, preparing for an interview, and conducting a job/internship search
  • HireABear to find positions that employers want to fill with Baylor students
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Mid-Semester Pep Talk

Blog QuoteIt’s that time in the semester where if you are not currently taking a test, you are preparing for those that loom in the near future.  I think sometimes when schedules get busy, we need to take a minute and breathe and realize that in each moment we are doing the best that we can.  I also want you to know that you do not have to do it all yourself.  From incredible Academic Support Programs resources in the Success Center to caring professors who want to help you succeed, Baylor offers a multitude of resources to help you on your journey.  If you need help finding a specific resource, please feel free to email me: Carroll_Crowson@baylor.edu.  In Career and Professional Development, we are here to help you, too, from deciding what you want to study at Baylor to acing that job interview.  Please let us know how we can assist you with whatever you may have questions about.  Most importantly, remember that you are valuable and valued here.  Take a minute to breathe and do your very best.  We believe in you!

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Majors Fair Today!

Don’t forget to stop by the University-Wide Majors Fair today to visit with representatives from a wide variety of Baylor majors and pre-professional programs.

2014 CPD Majors Fair

Hope to see you there!

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100 Healthcare Careers

CThis post was originally published on April 2, 2012.  Enjoy this oldie but goodie!

This marks our 100th post on the Mind Your Major blog!  While I wish I could say that we are giving away $100, that is not true.  Instead, we offer up what some of you might think is the next best thing…100 careers in healthcare.  How many of you, particularly those on a prehealthcare track, have been asked about your back-up plan?  How many of you have a solid back-up plan figured out?  Here are 100 ideas to get you started, with links to detailed information on each career path:

  1. Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Specialist
  2. Clinical Laboratory Scientist/Medical Technologist
  3. Health Educator
  4. Cytotechnologist
  5. Genetic Counselor
  6. Art Therapist
  7. Medical Librarian
  8. Dentist
  9. Built Environment Specialist
  10. Environmental Health Advocate
  11. Environmental Health Practitioner
  12. Food Safety Specialist
  13. Occupational Health and Safety Expert
  14. Forensic Biologist
  15. Forensic Chemist
  16. Forensic Odontologist
  17. Forensic Pathologist
  18. Forensic Toxicologist
  19. Geriatric Pharmacist
  20. Geriatric Psychiatrist
  21. Geriatric Staff Nurse
  22. Geriatrician
  23. Health Administrator
  24. Dental Informatics
  25. Nursing Informatics
  26. Biogerontologist
  27. Clinical Ethicist
  28. Disaster Medical Specialist
  29. Emergency Medicine
  30. Family Medicine
  31. Palliative Care Doctor
  32. Pathologist
  33. Doctor of Osteopathy
  34. Medical Doctor
  35. Physician Assistant
  36. Medical Scientist
  37. Psychiatrist
  38. Psychologist
  39. Rehabilitation Counselor
  40. Social Worker
  41. Licensed Professional Counselor
  42. Child Life Specialist
  43. Marriage and Family Therapist
  44. Substance Abuse Counselor
  45. Athletic Trainer
  46. Clinical Nurse Specialist
  47. Nurse Anesthetist
  48. Nurse Educator
  49. Audiologist
  50. Nurse Midwife
  51. Occupational Therapist
  52. Nurse Practitioner
  53. Physical Therapist
  54. Nurse Researcher
  55. Speech-Language Pathologist
  56. Veterinarian
  57. Dietitian
  58. Occupational Health Nurse
  59. Pediatric Nurse
  60. Public Health Nurse
  61. Registered Nurse
  62. Bioinformatics
  63. Optometrist
  64. Pharmaceutical Scientist
  65. Pharmacist
  66. Podiatrist
  67. Public Health- Biomedical and Laboratory Practice
  68. Biostatistics
  69. Epidemiology
  70. Global Health
  71. Maternal and Child Health
  72. Public Health Practice and Program Management
  73. Exercise Physiologist
  74. Kinesiotherapist
  75. Primary Care Sports Medicine
  76. Animal Behaviorist
  77. Demographer
  78. Biomedical Engineer
  79. Biotechnologist
  80. Perfusionist
  81. Acupuncturist
  82. Acute Care Nurse
  83. Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nurse
  84. Allergist/Immunologist
  85. Anesthesiologist Assistant
  86. Anesthesiologist
  87. Chiropractor
  88. Critical Care Nurse
  89. Dermatologist
  90. Hospitalist
  91. Internist
  92. Low Vision Therapist, Orientation and Mobility Specialist, and Vision Rehabilitation Therapist
  93. Music Therapist
  94. Naturopathic Doctor
  95. Neurologist
  96. Nuclear Medicine Physician
  97. Obstetrician/Gynecologist
  98. Ophthalmologist
  99. Surgeon
  100. Orthodontist

For even more ideas, visit the following websites:

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4 Weeks to Building a Network: Step 4

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Today, we conclude our series on networking that Cassie Thompson, a practicum student in Career and Professional Development, is sharing with us.  Please find step 1 here, step 2 here, and step 3 here.  Thanks again for sharing your insights with us, Cassie.

Time to follow-up and then move forward. Within 24 hours of meeting with a contact, write a thank you email. This doesn’t have to be long. Simply say thanks for taking the time to meet, add something personal about the experience to show you were listening, and if they gave great advice on something you should do next, tell them how you are going to move forward on that advice! Showing gratitude can get you far in this world as so few people do it.

Hopefully from your meetings you have come up with new names to contact and grow your network, and one day, one of those names will be the key to the right job! Additionally, maybe you were given other pieces of advice to focus on. Perhaps someone told you your resume needed some help, or that you needed more customer service training in order to work in that field. Make a list of all the advice given to you and start working on all of it. Add those new names to your spreadsheet and start sending more emails!

Congratulations! You now have a bona fide network!

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