5 Fun Facts about the On-Campus Internship Program

OCIP flyer HighRez

1.       An internship with the On-Campus Internship Program is a university recognized work experience focused on project-based work directly related to the student’s major or field of interest.

2.       The On-Campus Internship Program partners with 35 on-campus departments to offer more than 60 internship positions. There are over 40 positions currently available for application.

3.       Departments hosting on-campus interns are providing experiential learning opportunities for over a dozen majors. These include marketing, design, engineering, nutrition, and finance, to name a few.

4.       All On-Campus Internship Program positions are paid. The program is a student employment opportunity that allows students to earn any available work-study dollars.

5.       The On-Campus Internship Program provides professional development trainings and support to prepare students for graduate school or the workforce.

The On-Campus Internship Program is accepting applications NOW through September 6th. Check out all of the available positions using the link below and apply today!

On-Campus Internship Positions

Contact Chelsea_Waldrop@baylor.edu with questions!

 

2 Great Websites for Grad School Planning

This time of year, more and more students are starting to ask questions about grad school. How do I find an accredited program?…What are the admission requirements?…and finally…Is this going to cost an arm and a leg? There’s good news for those of you asking the same questions! I have recently stumbled upon 2 great resources for helping you get started…and it’s not as scary as you think!

  1. Kaplan’s 20-Minute Workout 

    Kaplan offers a FREE 20 Minute Workout practice exam with realistic questions. After you complete the exercise, you’ll see a breakdown of how well you did complete with answers and explanations. Click on the appropriate exam below to get started.

  2.  Affordable Colleges Online (ACU)

    This website is eye-popping and extremely user-friendly…2 of my favorite things! ACU offers a comprehensive look into grad schools by allowing you to search programs by subject, location, and degree type. It also provides information on rankings, accreditation, tuition, and financial aid. There’s even a search tool for individuals looking for online-only programs and online Christian colleges. Other resources include comprehensive guidebooks, student interviews, federal datasets and other materials created and vetted by experts in their fields.

 

Related posts:

Best Websites for Graduate and Professional School Planning

Is Grad School Right for Me and How Do I Choose a Program?

Post-Baccalaureate Pre-medical Programs

 

Network For Your Job Search

networkNetworking could be what helps you land a job.

If you take part in social networking sites, you probably have a pretty good idea of how networking can enhance your personal life. But, if you’re like many new college graduates, you’re probably not as comfortable about incorporating networking into your job search.

In spite of your discomfort, you need to incorporate networking into your job search: Especially in a competitive job market, networking could be what helps you land a job. In fact, many jobs are filled before they are even advertised—filled by people who learned about the opportunity before it was formally announced.

What is networking when it comes to the job search? It’s not about using people. Just as you look to build personal relationships through social networks, you want to build relationships to foster your professional life. These relationships can help you not only in your current job search but down the road as you build your career.

Networking is not one-sided: It works both ways. You offer assistance to others just as they offer assistance to you. Perhaps the easiest way to think about networking is to see it as an extension of being friendly, outgoing, and active.

Here are some tips for building and maintaining a healthy network:

  1. Make a list of everyone you know—and people they know—and identify how they could help you gather career information or experience.
    Who do you know at school? Professors, friends, and even friends’ parents can all be helpful contacts. Did you hold a part-time job? Volunteer? Serve an internship? Think about the people you came into contact with there.
  2. Sign up for an alumni mentoring program.
    Many colleges offer such programs, and they are a great way to build relationships in your field.
  3. Join the campus chapter of a professional society that relates to your career choice.
    In many ways, a professional society is an instant network: You’ll be with others who have the same general career interest. Plus, you may be able to learn more about your field from them. For example, you may be able to learn about the field and potential employers from others who share their internship experiences.
  4. Volunteer at a local museum, theater, homeless shelter—anywhere that even remotely relates to your field of study.
    By volunteering, you’ll not only learn about your chosen field firsthand, you’ll also be able to connect with people who are in the field.
  5. Speak to company representatives at career fairs, even if you’re not ready to look for a job.
    Be up front that you’re not currently in the job market and don’t take a lot of the representative’s time, but touching base with a potential employer now can help you down the road when you are ready.
  6. Attend company information sessions at your college and talk one-on-one to the recruiters who run them.
  7. Schedule informational interviews with people who can tell you about their careers.
    It’s best to ask to meet in person or by phone for a short interview, and don’t immediately start asking “How can you help me?” Plan your questions ahead of time, focusing on how the company works and how the person shaped his or her career path.
  8. Add your profile to LinkedIn.
    It’s free. And then, work your profile. Add work history (including internships!), skills, and keywords. Make connections to people you’ve worked with or met through networking. Ask for “recommendations” from people who have worked with you. You’ll find LinkedIn is a good source of suggestions for people in your field to contact for informational interviews.
  9. Remember to be courteous and tactful in all your conversations, to send thank-you notes to people who help you, and to find ways to help others as well.
    Don’t drop your network once you’ve gotten a job. Nurture the relationships you’ve built and look for opportunities to build new connections throughout your career. Getting started might be uncomfortable, but with time and practice, networking will be second nature.

 

Courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

Don’t Overlook Public Service Job Opportunities

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If you’re a college student exploring careers, you may not be aware of the wide range of job opportunities in public service. Careers in the federal government range from scientist to engineer to museum curator. Federal architects plan embassies around the world. Urban park rangers teach history to visitors. Biologists study sharks, sea turtles, and dolphins. Engineers develop robots for the space shuttle. Students in science, technology, engineering, math, and medical fields (STEMM) find occupations in plant pathology, fire protection engineering, naval architecture, astronomy, space science, and cryptanalysis.

As the nation’s largest employer with about 2 million civilian workers, the government is seeking to fill thousands of positions at any given time, and these federal jobs match almost every set of skills and interests. In the last fiscal year, the government hired nearly 92,000 full-time permanent employees, and these jobs were located in all 50 states and overseas, not just in Washington, D.C.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture employs more than 1,000 civil engineers. More than 3,500 people at the Social Security Administration work in information technology management. If your interests are heavy on science, look for jobs at the National Institutes of Health or the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Physics and engineering? Think about opportunities at the U.S. Department of Energy and the 10 NASA centers around the country.

 
What’s Real About Federal Employment

It is a myth that the government isn’t hiring. More than 76,800 federal workers were hired in 2013 and nearly 92,000 became new federal employees in 2014.

Another myth is that federal pay and benefits can’t compete with other sectors. In fact, both pay and benefits are competitive. Total pay also can vary depending on where the job is located. In more expensive geographic areas, the addition of locality pay bumps up salaries to ensure the same standard of living for employees, regardless of their location.

Salary is not the only consideration when comparing job opportunities. Federal employees get other benefits including student loan repayment assistance; flexible schedules, and vacation and sick leave packages; health and retirement benefits; training and other professional development activities; and advancement opportunities.

Take Advantage of the Opportunities

As a student or recent graduate, you are eligible for the Pathways Programs that give students from qualifying educational institutions and programs, and recent graduates, a chance to explore different career paths, gain experience, and decide if an agency is right for them.

If you are a current student, you are eligible for internships, and if you are a recent graduate, you can work in government for one year—with both opportunities potentially leading to full-time employment. For either of these, you undertake a program of 40 hours of training and development, possibly including mentorship.

The government’s most prestigious fellowship is the two-year-long Presidential Management Fellows (PMF) Program, open to individuals with qualifying advanced degrees. In this program, you receive 80 hours of training and development, complete an individual development plan, and are assigned a senior-level mentor. You also spend a portion of your time in a rotational or development assignment, to experience opportunities in your discipline in another department or agency.

Where to Apply

The federal government has dozens of departments and agencies. To narrow your focus, it helps to concentrate on agencies that make the most sense for your interests, whether it is federal housing, public health, or international issues.

You can search for those agencies on several websites:

1.     USAJOBS.gov—The federal government’s jobs portal.

2.     USA.gov—A government website that provides an “A-Z index” of federal agencies.

3.     FEB.gov—A forum for communication and collaboration among federal agencies outside of Washington that you can use to find federal points of contact in your area.

4.     Fedscope.opm.gov—An Office of Personal Management website containing federal human resources data.

5.     Bestplacestowork.org—The Partnership’s site ranking where federal agencies stand based on employee satisfaction surveys.

6.     Social Media—Many agencies are on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and other sites.

How to Apply for Federal Job Opportunities

The government’s jobs website, USAJOBS.gov, has resources explaining how to apply for jobs. The Partnership’s Go Government website also offers a wealth of information on applying. On GoGovernment.org, you will find a step-by-step guide on the application process, along with profiles of young federal employees, and occupation guides that describe the people and positions that specific agencies are hiring.

If you are unsure about which federal agency you’re interested in, the Partnership produces the annual Best Places to Work in the Federal Government® rankings that offer information on which agencies house the highest percentages of satisfied employees. Another good place to start is at federal agency websites, where you’ll find information about the mission and the work, and get a flavor for an agency’s culture.

By:  Caleb Campbell

Caleb Campbell is an associate manager on the Education and Outreach team at the Partnership for Public Service. In his role, Campbell manages the Call to Serve network providing resources and information to more than 1,000 colleges and universities on federal hiring and the best strategies for getting the top talent into government.

Courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

Good Questions to Ask at the Interview

 

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You’ve probably heard it a million times: A job interview should be a two-way conversation. You may assume that means someone asks questions and you offer answers. But that’s only half of the conversation. Interviewers expect you to ask questions, too—and asking thoughtful questions can polish your image as a job seeker.

Asking questions is one way to show that you are interested in the job. It shows you’ve researched the organization and you’ve heard what the interviewer has told you about the job. Your questions also will help you see how the job and the organization fit into your career goals.

When preparing questions before the interview, your first stop should be the organization’s website—don’t want to ask questions that are already covered online. Next, pay close attention to details that come to light during the interview—you’ll want to include questions on information you hear.

Here are examples of questions you can ask (and why you should ask them):

What does a typical work day look like? What is a typical week like in this job?

(You’re showing interest in life on the job in the organization.)

With whom would I be working? Who would be my supervisor?

(You’re looking seriously at your potential place in the organization.)

What are the challenges facing the person in this position? What are your expectations for this role?

(You’re asking about your fit within the company and your future with the organization.)

Why did you choose to work for this company?

(Ask this question of anyone you meet during your interview. It gives the interviewer a chance to “sell” the company and gives you insight into what others think about working for the organization.)

How would you describe your company culture?

(Are you and the company are well matched? Is this the environment you want to join?)

What is the natural career progression for employees with my skill set?

(You’re demonstrating that you’re thinking about a long-term future with the company.)

Does this organization have a formal mentor or coaching program? How is it structured?

(This illustrates that you are interested in being a good employee and improving on the job.)

What kind of internal and external training do you provide?

(This question illustrates your desire to excel in the job.)

After you’ve asked your questions, restate your interest in the organization.

Then, ask for the job—this reiterates your interest in joining the organization.

Finally, ask these few last questions:

  • What is the next step in the hiring process?
  • When will you make your decision?
  • May I call you?
  • When is a good time?

 

Courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

7 Popular Careers for an ISFP: A look into the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator

sunflower saying

ISFP’s have a strong aesthetic awareness and tend to seek out beauty in their surroundings. They enjoy hands-on activities and being able see tangible results from their work.

Most ISFP’s are extremely loyal and observant to the needs of others, although they may be harder to get to know at first. They are quiet and reserved, but have a special ability to pick up on the emotions of other people and enjoy being able to provide practical help.

ISFP’s are rarely assertive and tend to shy away from positions of authority, preferring to take more of a supporting role.  They appreciate clear expectations, set deadlines, and a degree of autonomy at work. ISFP’s live in the present and thrive in a flexible and supportive environment.

Here are 7 popular careers for an ISFP:

 

Not sure what your personality type is? Schedule a Career Exploration appointment with a Career Advisor to learn more about your personality and interests, and how those translate into career paths.

ARE YOU DRESSED FOR SUCCESS?

It’s important to dress your best for an interview AND a career fair. But it’s hard to always know what is appropriate to wear and what is not. Here you’ll find some quick-tips to help you look your best and dress for success.

what TO wear

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  1. Women’s Business Attire
  • A dark or gray-colored pant or skirt suit
  • A solid-colored blouse
  • Flats or pumps with a mid or low heel
  • Natural makeup
  • Simple jewelry
  • Grooming: Hair combed and/or pulled back
  1. Women’s Business Casual
  • Dress pants or pencil skirt
  • A solid-colored blouse, top, button-down or cardigan
  • Flats or pumps with a mid or low heel
  • Natural makeup
  • Simple jewelry
  • Grooming: Hair combed and/or pulled back

 

pic2

  1. Men’s Business Attire
  • A dark or gray-colored business suit
  • A solid-colored button-down shirt (light-colored or white), subtle pinstripes
  • A solid or subtle patterned tie
  • Belt and socks (black or brown)
  • Dress shoes (black or brown)
  • Grooming: hair combed, facial hair trimmed/shaved
  1. Men’s Business Casual
  • Dress slacks or khaki pants
  • A solid-colored button-down shirt (light-colored or
  • white), subtle pinstripes
  • A solid or subtle patterned tie
  • Belt and Socks (black or brown)
  • Dress shoes (black or brown)
  • Grooming: hair combed, facial hair trimmed/shaved

 

What NOT to wear

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Women

  • Sleeveless, thin-strapped or strapless dresses and tops
  • Low cut or revealing dresses or tops
  • Skirts or dresses that are too short. Hems that reach the knee or a little above the knee are the best options!
  • T-shirts, shorts, jeans or workout clothing
  • Open-toed shoes, sandals or tennis shoes
  • Heels that are too tall. 2 inches or lower is the ideal heal size.
  • More than 4 pieces of jewlery
  • Grooming: heavy perfume, unbrushed hair

 

pic 1

Men

  • Loud patterned shirts or ties
  • T-shirts, short sleeve shirts, shorts and jeans
  • Flip-flops, sandals and tennis shoes
  • Bare feet (always wear dress socks)
  • Rolled-up sleeves
  • Sunglasses
  • Hats or ball caps
  • Grooming: messy hair, untrimmed beard or stubble on your face

Things You Should Know

  • Keep it clean, first impressions are important. Consider taking out your piercings and covering up your tattoos.
  • You should cut the threads (usually is the shape of an “X”) that hold the vents (or flaps) together on new suits, blazers and skirts.
  • Avoid wearing strong perfumes or lotions. Remember some people can be overpowered by smells.
  • You should wear your name tag on your right side so the person shaking your hand will not only hear your name, but also see it.
  • Leave phones, sunglasses, lanyards, backpacks, or anything that could be distracting in your car or at a designated storage space.
  • Dressing for success doesn’t have to cost a fortune—think outside the box! Check out reasonably-priced stores such as Target and Walmart, or even local consignment shops like Goodwill and Salvation Army. And don’t hesitate to borrow from someone!

 

Brought to you by:  Ashley Alcala

Top 10 Skills Employers Want to See on Your Resume

It’s a given that a good grade point average (GPA) is very important to potential employers. According to the annual Job Outlook survey, many employers say they screen by GPA. But what else do they look for?

Employers considering new college graduates for job openings are looking for leaders who can work as part of team, communicate effectively, and solve problems.

Here are the top 10:

  1. Leadership
  2. Ability to work in a team
  3. Written communication skills
  4. Problem-solving skills
  5. Strong work ethic
  6. Analytical/quantitative skills
  7. Technical skills
  8. Verbal communication skills
  9. Initiative
  10. Computer skills

How much influence do these skills have on your chances of getting an interview and landing a job? Here’s how employers ranked those skills and abilities:

top 10 skills

Courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

Personal Branding With Social Media

 

Build your brand online and network with professionals in your field using social media that reflects your career or professional goals. (You may want to create separate personal and professional social media pages.)

Facebook

  • Use a professional-looking picture—you can use the same picture on all of your social media pages.
  • Add the following to the “about” section: internship and other educational experience, a short bio, and links to other professional social media.
  • Follow organizations you’re interested in to discover intern and full-time job opportunities, announcements about the company, and potential contacts in the organization.

Linkedin

  • Drop in your professional photo.
  • Customize your headline with keywords and phrases that are related to your desired industry or profession.
  • Request a connection with professionals you’ve worked with at internships or met through networking channels. Be sure to “personalize” your request by offering some information on why you would like to connect.

Twitter

  • Use a professional profile photo. Your cover photo can indicate your interests.
  • Choose a Twitter handle that will be recognizable as you.
  • Tell your story in your bio: university, class year, major, and keywords describing your career interests.
  • Add a link to your LinkedIn profile, your personal website, blog, and/or online portfolio.

Pinterest

  • Drop your professional-looking picture on your main page.
  • Select a username that is consistent with your other social media platforms.
  • Create a bio that reflects your goals and brand. Who are you? Why are you using Pinterest? What are your professional aspirations?
  • Create boards using images and content to share your interests and experiences in your field.
  • Mark boards “secret,” if they are going to contain content you would prefer to keep private.

Courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

Top 10 Career Strategies for Freshmen and Sophomores

You control your career destiny! Just going to class and picking up your diploma after four years doesn’t cut it. You need to become active on and off campus.

Becoming marketable to employers or graduate schools is a four-year job. Here are the top 10 things you can do during college to make yourself marketable at job-search time. In fact, if you do all 10 of these, you’ll be unstoppable:

  1. Keep your grades up—Employers and graduate schools want candidates with good grades. That will probably never change. Doing well academically not only proves that you have a good knowledge base, but indicates a strong work ethic—a trait that employers value.
  2. Identify your interests, skills, values, and personal characteristics—The first step to clarifying your career goals is to go through a process of self-assessment. Visit your career center and take advantage of the self-assessment instruments it has to offer.
  3. Actively explore career options—You owe it to yourself to find a career that enriches your life, not one that brings you down. Actively exploring careers means talking with professionals in occupations of interest and observing professionals on the job. Your career center probably has alumni and other volunteers who are willing to talk to you about their careers. Also, attend any career expos, career fairs, and career speaker panels that are offered.
  4. Become active in extracurricular activities and clubs—Active involvement in activities and clubs on campus is highly valued by employers and graduate schools. Joining a club is fine, but becoming active within that club is what matters most. Become a leader, hold an office, or coordinate an event. You will develop your skills in leadership and teamwork—skills that recruiters covet!
  5. Get involved in community service—It’s important that you begin to understand and appreciate the importance of giving back to your community, and that you live in a larger community than your college or hometown. Typically, students look at community service as a chore. After they’ve served, however, it’s usually one of the most rewarding experiences they’ve had! Recruiters love to see that you’ve volunteered to help in your community.
  6. Develop your computer skills—Take advantage of the computer courses and workshops your college offers. You can also learn a lot by just experimenting with different software packages on your own. Finally, you should learn how to develop your own web page or web-based portfolio. There are many web-design software tools that make it real easy to develop your own web page! Contact your college’s information technology office to see how to get started.
  7. Develop your writing skills—Over and over, company and graduate school recruiters complain about the lack of writing skills among college graduates. Don’t avoid classes that are writing intensive. Work at developing your writing skills. If there is a writing center on campus, have them take a look at your papers from time to time. Remember, the first impression you give to recruiters is typically your cover letter or personal statement.
  8. Complete at least one internship in your chosen career field—More and more, internships are the springboards to employment and getting into graduate programs. Many recruiters say that when they need to fill entry-level jobs, they will only hire previous interns. In addition to making yourself more marketable, internships also are a great way to explore careers and determine whether or not certain careers are for you. When you work for a company as an intern for three to four months, you get a really good feel for whether the field (and company) is one in which you want to work day in and day out!
  9. Gain an appreciation of diversity through study abroad, foreign languages, and courses—We are now, more than ever, working within a global work force. For you to be successful at work and in your life, you must stretch yourself, and learn about people and cultures different than yours. Take advantage of the wonderful study-abroad opportunities and the courses relating to diversity. This is your time to travel! Most people find it harder to take time to travel as they begin their careers and start families.
  10. Use your career center all four years—Your college career center can help you throughout your entire college career. Here is just a sampling of what your career center can help you do:
  1. Choose your major and career direction,
  2. Explore career options,
  3. Obtain an internship,
  4. Write a resume and cover letter,
  5. Develop your interviewing skills,
  6. Identify your interests and values,
  7. Develop a job-search or graduate school plan,
  8. Connect you with prospective employers (career fairs, on-campus recruiting, and more), and
  9. Connect you with alumni mentors.

 

Remember, you control your career destiny. Don’t wait until your senior year to start realizing your goals. Your career train is on the move. Jump on board now so you can reach your destination!

By Bob Orndorff. Courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers.